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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Enfield, New Hampshire"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2009 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofto1990enfi 



ANNUAL REPORT 



of the 



TOWN OF ENFIELD 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Year Ending December 



1990 



In. ra^amonry cz>f 




1975 — 1990 

The Town of Enfield honors Phyllis B. Goodwin 
for her many years of dedicated service as a 
member of the Enfield Public Library Board of 
Trustees . 




to 



ROSE B . VnTEIjCH 




Rose devotedly served the Town of Enfield as 
Tax Collector for over 27 years, until her 
retirement in December. Her commitment and 
dedication to the Town will be remembered for 
many years. Best wishes for the future. 



IISTDEIX: 



Report to Citizens of Enfield 3 

Town Offices & Board Hours 5 

Town Officers 6 

Town Warrant 10 

Budget 19 

Suimiary Inventory 23 

Statement of i^ropriations , Taxes Assessed & Tax Rate ...24 
Conparative Statement of i^ropriations & E3q)enditures ... 25 

Balance Sheet , 28 

Sewer Project Account 30 

Schedule of Long-Term Indebtedness 31 

Schedule of Town Property » 32 

Independent Auditor ' s Report 33 

Town Clerk ' s Report 35 

Tax Collector ' s Report 36 

Summary of Tax Sale/Lien Accounts 37 

Collections Report of Municipal Water & Sewer Depts 38 

Treasurer ' s Report 39 

Summary of Receipts 41 

Summary of Payments 43 

Detailed Statement of Receipts 46 

Detailed Statement of Payments 48 

Report of Trustees of Trust Funds 58 

Summary of Capital Reserve Funds 59 

Report of Enfield Budget Committee 60 

Report of Enfield Building Inpsector /Health Officer 61 

Report of Enfield Conservation Commission 62 

Report of Enfield Fast Squad 63 

Report of Enfield Fire Department 65 

Report of Enfield Historical Records 66 

Report of Enfield Municipal Water & Sewer Departments 67 

Report of Enfield Planning Board & Zoning Board 69 

Report of Enfield Police Department 70 

Report of Enfield Public Library 72 

Report of Enfield Town Clock Committee 73 

Report of Grafton County Conmissioners 75 

Report of Headrest 77 

Report of Hospice of the Upper Valley 78 

Report of Mascoma Home Health Services 79 

Report of Tovm Forest Fire Warden & State Forest Ranger . . 80 

Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee 81 

Town Meeting 1990 82 

Vital Statistics 87 

J^lication for i^)pointment 99 



TO THE CITIZHasrS OF THE 

Tocsnsr oe eistexeud 



1990 brought a reversal of the growth in building 
construction of the past few years. Errployment was down, 
creating a greater nuniber of requests for Town assistance. 

The town wide property re-valuation has been corrpleted and 
the abatement requests will be reviewed on an individual 
basis. 

Several new policies have been developed to assist town 
officials. These include Chain of Command, Purchase Orders, 
Emergency Response Plan and a Wage/Salary schedule. We have 
also developed (in some cases re-stated) rules and 
regulations pertaining to the Transfer Station, the Stunp 
Dunp and Shakoma Beach. We also made the decision this year 
not to pick up commercial rubbish. 

One form that you won't receive this year is the Inventory 
of Taxable Property. 

The Selectmen believe twice a year annual billing will 
decrease the need to borrow. There is a warrant article 
this year seeking your advice. 

During 1990, the Selectmen authorized several studies, 
namely. Solid Waste Management, Personnel Study, Water 
Iirprovements , Enfield Road Map and Community Developnent 
Block Grant. Each one is moving forward and we await final 
reports. Each has a definite inpact on the community and we 
hope to have interested citizens volunteer for anticipated 
study committees. 

This summer the Town hired Patrick Foley as the research 
intern. The task was to document names and locations of our 
Class VI Roads. Thanks to Pat, the Selectmen have the 
information needed to develop a policy on Class VI Roads. He 
also coiTpiled a listing of the Town's previous Selectmen, 
dating back to 1776. Due to the tremendous success of the 
internship program we hope to fund this position again in 
the future. 



We would like to recognize the Enfield Town Volunteers for 
painting the Huse Park building and benches. The appearance 
of the park has been greatly irrproved by their efforts. 

In 1988 we formed a Land Conservation Investment Program. 
This year Walter Paine placed a conservation easement on his 
300+ acres on George Hill. The Town appreciates Mr. Paine 's 
participation in this most iirportant program. 

The passing of the year has done nothing to alleviate the 
problems of the over-crowding and liability to the Town of 
an inadequate Police Department location. This year the 
Police Facility Study Committee will bring before the Town 
Meeting some options; our desire is to see a solution to a 
regrettable situation. Therefore, we ask your support for 
one of these options. 

We would like to take this opportunity to extend our 
gratitude to Catherine A. Russi for her many years of 
dedicated service as our Town Treasurer. 



Sincerely, 

Evelyn L. Palmer 

C. James Martel 

Donald J. Crate 

Enfield Board of Selectmen 



TOtNOSr OFFICES AISID BO.ARIZ) HOUFtS 



SKTiFlClMEN'S OFFICE: 
632-4201 


Monday through Friday 




9-3 PM 


SET,F.CmRN'S MEETING: 


Monday evenings 




7 FM. 


TCWN CT>FRK: 
632-5001 


Monday through Friday 
Thursday evening 




9-3 PM 
6-8:30 


TAX CXDT,T,KC10R: 
632-5001 


Monday and Wednesday 
Thursday evening 




9 -Noon 
6-8:30 


LIBRARY: 
632-7145 


Mon . , Tues . , Thurs . 
Wednesday 




1-8 PM 
10-6 m. 


WET, FARE: 
632-4201 


Tuesday through Friday 
By i^pointment 


1:: 


30-2:30 PM 


PLANNING BOARD: 

Administrator 

632-4067 


2nd & 4th Wednesday 
Monday 




7 PM 
9-3 PM 


ZBA: 


2nd Tuesday 




7:30 PM 


CONSERVATION CCMIISSION: 1st Thursday 




7:30 PM 


POLICE DEPARTMENT: 
632-7501 Office 


448- 


-1212 


Emergency 


ENFIELD FAST SQUAD: 


448- 


-1212 


Emergency 


ENFIELD FIRE DEPARTMENT: 448- 


-1212 


Emergency 



RUBBISH COLLECTION SITE: 



STUMP & BRUSH DUMP: 



East Hill Rd. Sat. /Sun. 8-4 PM 
Summer Dates to be Announced 



Bog Road 



8-4 PM 
9-3 PM 



WATER & SEWER Monday through Friday 

SUPERINTENDENT By i^pointment 

632-4002 (After hours emergencies ONLY, report to 448-1212) 



TOWISr OFFICEFtS 





Term 


E2q)ires 


MDDERATOR: 






William A. Warren, resigned 




1992 


Franklyn W. Phillips 




1992 


SKTrRCiMEN: 






Evelyn L. Palmer 




1991 


C. James Martel 




1992 


Donald J. Crate 




1993 



TCWN AnyllNISTEU^TOR: 
Sylvia de Montigny 

TCWN CLERK: 
Ilene P. Reed 1993 

Carolee T. Hi^Dee, Deputy 1991 

TAX COLLECTOR: 

Rose B. Welch, resigned 1992 

Carol C. Keating, Tax Collector 1991 

Carolee T. Hi^Dee, Deputy 1991 

TREASURER: 

Catherine A. Russi, resigned 1993 

Martha E. Lorimer, Deputy, resigned 1991 

Donna I. Egner 1991 

Catherine A. Russi, Deputy 1991 

WATER/SEWER SUPERINTENDENT: 
Timothy Jennings 

BOAT PERMIT FEE AGENT: 
David J. Crate 1991 

OVERSEER OF PUBLIC WELFARE: 
Carol C. Keating 1991 

HIGHWAY SUPERVISOR: 
Gerald Lashua 1991 



PERMZ\NENT POLICE OFFICERS; 

Chief Peter H. Giese 

Sergeant Jane Carpenter 

Richard A. Crate Jr. 

Michael Whitcoinb 

Scott Thonpson 



SPECIAL OFFICERS: 

Vernon L. Bond Jr. 1991 

Kevin Copp 1991 

Edward Doten 1991 

Douglas Dutile 1991 

Ronald Hill 1991 

James A. MacKenzie 1991 

Jonathan E. Putnam 1991 

George Shadowens 1991 

Earl Smith 1991 

William Solari 1991 

Paul Stoner 1991 

Glenn Taylor 1991 

Howard Walton 1991 

Antonio D. White 1991 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECKLIST: 

Barbara McKinley 1992 

Beverly McKinley 1994 

Robert Hewitt 1996 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 

Sarah Snow 1991 

Craig Sanborn 1991 

Robert Hewitt 1992 

Cecilia Auferio 1992 

Leonard Johnston 1993 

Donald Tobin 1993 

Evelyn L. Palmer, Ex-Officio 1991 

Katharine Riley, alt. 1992 

Judith Lanpe, alt. 1992 

Henry Brown III, alt. 1993 



PLANNING BOARD: 

Cynthia Hayes, resigned 1991 

Timothy Taylor 1993 

Ilene P. Reed 1993 

Thomas Tantillo 1991 

Jeffrey Densinore, resigned 1992 

TiiTKDthy Lentine 1992 

John J.G. Nicholson 1993 

Walter Tucker, resigned 1992 

C. James Martel, Ex-Officio 1991 

Geraldine Goslar, alt. 1993 

Donald J. Jacques, alt. 1993 

William E. Nutt, alt. 1993 

PLANNING BOARD/ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT ADMINISTRATOR: 
Francis V. Lombardi 

BUDGET COMMITTEE: 

Keith Cutting 1991 

Russell Muzzey, III 1991 

Franklyn Phillips 1991 

Dwight Marchetti 1992 

June Rice 1992 

Denise Smith 1992 

Herman S. Meyer, Jr. 1993 

Kenneth Stanford 1993 

B. Kent Tice 1993 

Evelyn L. Palmer, Selectmen's Rep. 1991 

TRUSTEE OF TRUST FUNDS: 

Chester A. Beede 1991 

John P. Carr, Treasurer 1992 

John Goodwin 1993 

RECREATION CCMMISSION: 

Peggy Vincent 1991 

Wallace Andrew 1992 

Jane Smardon 1992 

Vicki Pellerin 1992 

Theron Chase 1993 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES: 

Phyllis Goodwin, deceased 1993 

Philip Cronenwett 1991 

John L. Dunn, Jr. 1991 

Greta Crilley 1992 



LIBRARIAN: 
Marjorie A. Carr 

LIBRARY ASSISTANT: 
Catherine A. Russi 

AUDITOR: 
Kathryn Richmond 1991 

ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT: 

Theron Chase 1991 

Bertrand Gilbert 1991 

Harry Auger 1992 

Keith Irwin 1992 

Gerry Stark 1993 

Austin Kovacs, alternate 1992 

Nancy Scovner, alternate 1992 

Donald J. Crate, Selectmen's Rep. 1991 

TCMN HISTORIAN: 
Jeanette Haarala 

CEMETERY AGENT: 
Mark Houston 1991 

FIRE WARDS: 

Donald J. Crate 1991 

David A. Crate 1992 

Donald A. Crate 1993 

SCHOOL BOARD MEMBERS FROM ENFIELD: 
Jo Ann Clark 1991 

REPRESENTATIVES TO THE GENERAL COURT: 

Patricia Berry Brown 1992 

C. Dana Christy 1992 

David M. Scanlon 1992 






To the inhabitants of the Town of Enfield in the County of 
Grafton qualified to vote in town affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Enfield Elementary 
School on Tuesday, March 12, 1991 at 10:00 a.m. to act on 
Articles 1 through 29. 

Polls will open at 10:00 a.m. and close at 8:00 p.m. 

The business portion of the meeting to act on Articles 8 
through 29 will be held at 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 12, 
1991. 



Article 1. To choose by ballot to serve for: 

Three years: One Selectman 

One Library Trustee 
One Recreation Commission Member 
One Trustee of Trust Funds 
One Fire Ward 

Two years: One Treasurer, unexpired terro 

One Library Trustee, unexpired term 

One year: One Moderator, unexpired tenn 

One Tax Collector, unexpired term 



Article 2. Pursuant to a petition of not less than 2 
percent of the legal voters: 

Are you in favor of increasing the Board of Selectmen to 
five (5) members? 

Yes [] No [] 



10 



Article 3. Are you in favor of the adoption of the 
following building code, to be known as the Town of Enfield 
Building Code, to supplement the building permit ordinance, 
adopted March 23, 1968 and the building code, adopted March 
4, 1975, under this code: 

I. The Zoning Board of Mjustinent shall perform the 
functions of the Building Code Board of Adjustment as 
provided in RSA 673:1 (V); 

II. The Board of Selectmen or its designee shall act 
as the building inspector; 

III. The Town hereby adopts the BOCA National Building 
Code, as recommended and maintained by the Building 
Officials and Code Administrators International, Inc., 
1990, 11th edition. 

IV. The penalties shall be as provided in RSA 
676 as amended. 

This amendment was approved by the Planning Board. This 
amendment was submitted by the Selectmen. 

Yes [] No [] 



Article 4. Are you in favor of Amendment No. 1 as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as follows; 

Section 400 - Present Section 400 will become Section 400.1; 
Section 400.2 will be added to read as follows: 

400.2: Lots crossed by Town Lines: When part of a lot in 
single or joint ownership lies outside the Town, the portion 
within the Town shall conform to the use regulation of the 
ordinance. In applying dimensional controls to that portion 
of the lot within the Town, the dimensions of the whole lot 
shall be considered without reference to the Town Line. 

Yes [] No [] 



11 



Article 5. Are you in favor of Amendment No. 2 as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as 
follows : 

Section 400 - Present Section 400 will become Section 400.1; 
Section 400.3 will be added to read as follows: 

A lot which lies in two or more districts must have 
sufficient area within at least one of the districts to meet 
the miniinum lot size of that district. Any structures 
placed on such a lot, except driveways, fences, mailboxes 
and stone walls, shall be located only within such zoning 
district ( s ) . 



Yes [] 



No [] 



Article 6. Are you in favor of Amendment No. 3 as proposed 
by the Planning Board for the Town Zoning Ordinance as 
follows: 

Section 401.3, paragraph L: the last two lines to be revised 
to read: 

...however, this provision shall not apply to conventional 
antennas, lightning rods, cupolas, church steeples, 
chimneys, silos and windmills. The setback for a windmill 
shall be at least equal to the height of the structure. 



Yes [] 



No [] 



Article 7. Amendment 4. Are you in favor of the adoption 
of the amendment to the existing Town Zoning Ordinance, 
titled "Petitioned Amendment to the Zoning Ordinance of 
Enfield, N.H.," which amendment provides for the election of 
the Enfield Zoning Board of Adjustment, and was presented to 
the Board of Selectmen on Monday, Deceirtoer 10, 1990, 
pursuant to petition by certain legal voters of the Town of 
Enfield: amendment is as follows: 



12 



ARTICLE V 

ZONING BOARD OF ADJUS1MENT 

500 Creation 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment shall have five members 
in accordance with the provisions of RSA 673:3 and 
elected in conformity with RSA 673:5. There shall be 
five alternate members appointed by the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment. Each member of the Board and each 
alternate shall be a resident of the Town of Enfield. 
This section shall take effect March 10, 1992. 

This amendment was endorsed by the Planning Board. 

Yes [] No [] 



Article 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
e^^propriate the sum of two hundred and eighty-eight thousand 
dollars ($288,000) for the construction and furnishings of a 
new Police Facilities Building, and to fund such 
appropriations by authorizing the borrowing of a sum not to 
exceed $288,000 in the name of the Town by the issuance of 
serial notes or bonds, in accordance with the provisions of 
the Municipal Finance Act (RSA Chapter 33) and amendments 
thereto; and further, to authorize the Selectmen to 
determine the time and place of payment and rate of interest 
of such notes or bonds and to take such other action as may 
be necessary to effect their issuance and sale. (2/3 paper 
ballot passage required, polls must be open a minimum of 1 
hour.) [10 year tax inpact estimate each year beginning in 
1992, .19/$1, 000 valuation.] 



Article 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
apprcpriate the sum of one hundred and seventy-five thousand 
dollars ($175,000) for the purchase of an existing structure 
to be used for a police/municipal building, and to fund such 
^prqpriations by authorizing the borrowing of a sum not to 
exceed $175,000 in the name of the Town by the issuance of 
serial notes or bonds, in accordance with the provisions of 
the Municipal Finance Act (RSA Chapter 33) and amendments 



13 



thereto; and further, to authorize the Selectmen to 
determine the time and place of payment and rate of interest 
of such notes or bonds and to take such other action as may- 
be necessary to effect their issuance and sale. (2/3 paper 
ballot passage required, polls must be open a minimum of 1 
hour . ) [5 year tax inpact estimate each year beginning in 
1992, .19/$1, 000 valuation.] 



Article 10. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of ninety thousand dollars ($90,000) for 
the purchase of a 10-wheeler truck with plow equipnent, and 
to fund such appropriations by authorizing the borrowing of 
a sum not to exceed $90,000 in the name of the Town by the 
issuance of serial notes or bonds, in accordance with the 
provisions of the Municipal Finance Act (RSA Chapter 33) and 
amendments thereto; and further, to authorize the Selectmen 
to determine the time and place of payment and rate of 
interest of such notes or bonds and to take such other 
action as may be necessary to effect their issuance and 
sale. (2/3 paper ballot passage required, polls must be 
open a minimum of 1 hour.) [5 year tax inpact estimate each 
year beginning 1992, .10/$1,000 valuation.] 



Article 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to borrow money in anticipation of taxes, as 
provided under RSA Chapter 33. 



Article 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $118,000 for the following purposes: 

Municipal Buildings $ 22 , 000 

Whitney Hall 6,000 

Cemetery Land Acquisition 50, 000 

Water Department 40,000 

and to authorize the withdrawal of these sums from their 
respective Capital Reserve Funds. 



14 



Ax±icle 13. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the 
Police Cruiser Capital Reserve Fund created in 1965. The 
fund was created for the purpose of replacement of the 
police cruiser when necessary. Due to the increased needs 
of the Town, one cruiser is replaced annually. Said funds, 
$229.32, with accumulated interest to date of withdrawal, to 
be transferred to the Town's general fund to be used to 
reduce taxes. (Majority vote required.) 



Article 14. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the 
Tax Mapping Capital Reserve Fund created in 1975. The fund 
was created for the acquisition of a tax map for the Town. 
This was acconplished and the map is updated annually. Said 
funds, $174.61, with accuirailated interest to date of 
withdrawal to be transferred to the Town's general fund to 
be used to reduce taxes. (Majority vote required.) 



Article 15. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the 
Sewerage Study Capital Reserve Fund created in 1972. The 
sewage study was coirpleted in 1983. Said funds, $211.44, 
with accumulated interest to date of withdrawal to be 
transferred to the Town's general fund to be used to reduce 
taxes. (Majority vote required.) 



Article 16. To see if the Town will vote to discontinue the 
New Highway Trucks Capital Reserve Fund created in 1978. 
The fund was created for the purpose of Highway use and to 
establish a fund for a new Highway truck. Said funds, 
$860.93, with accimiulated interest to date of withdrawal, to 
be transferred to the Town's general fund to be used to 
reduce taxes. (Majority vote required.) 



Article 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $4,000 for the demolition and rough 
grading of the property known as the Poulios House, 
(estimated tax impact of .02/$l,000 valuation for one year.) 



15 



Article 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $9,200 for the purchase of 1200 feet 
of 5 inch hose and adapters for the Fire Department, 
(estimated tax irrpact .04/$l,000 valuation for one year.) 



Article 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,285,440 which represents the 
bottom line of the posted budget (MS-7) as recommended by 
the Budget Committee, exclusive of Special Warrant Articles 
8, 9, 10, 12, 17, and 18. 



Article 20. To see if the Town will vote to adopt the semi- 
annual collection of taxes method according to RSA 76:15a, 
and provided by RSA 76:15b. Vote of Town Meeting is 
advisory only. 

Article 21. Pursuant to a petition of twenty-five (25) or 
more legal voters: 

To see if the Town wishes to support the proposed Class VI 
Highway Policy under consideration by the Board of 
Selectmen. Vote of Town Meeting is advisory only. 



Article 22. To see if the Town will vote to deed to Richard 
Gordon Dow and Barbara Jean Dow, a certain tract of land, 
with the spring thereon situate in Enfield, in the County of 
Grafton and State of New Hanpshire, on the easterly side of 
Baltic Street, conveyed to the Town of Enfield by deed of 
Richard Cordon Dow and Barbara Jean Dow and William F. Lapan 
and Georgia K. Lapan dated November 30, 1981 and recorded in 
the Grafton County Registry of Deeds, Book 1437, Page 245; 
also identified as Map 37 Lot 19-1. This property was deeded 
to the Town of Enfield for a public spring. As the water is 
unfit for drinking, the spring was capped. Richard and 
Barbara Dow requested return of the land. William Lapan 
does not want to receive an interest in this property. 
Georgia Lapan is deceased. 



16 



Article 23. To see if the Town will vote to accept and 
maintain as a pi±)lic highway "Evenchance Road" as shown on 
"Subdivision of Evenchance," dated August 1986 and recorded 
in the Grafton County Registry of Deeds as Plan Nimiber 
4106, T&M Surveys, Inc., Project No. 206286, Lebanon, New 
Hairpshire . 



Article 24. To see if the Town will vote to accept and 
maintain as a public highway "Anderson Hill Road" as shown 
on "Subdivision of Anderson Hill Properties, Enfield, N.H.,: 
dated ;^ril 1986, was revised October 14, 1987 and recorded 
in Grafton County Registry of Deeds as Plan Number 4743, T&M 
Surveys, Inc., Project No. 199086, Lebanon, New Hairpshire; 
"Annexation Plan Prepared for Anderson Hill Properties" by 
T&M Associates, Inc., as Project No. 253387A, which plan is 
dated March, 1989, was revised May 12, 1989, and is recorded 
in said Registry as Plan Number 5775; and "Subdivision Plan 
for Anderson Hill Properties, Enfield, N.H." by T&M 
Associates, Inc., as Project No. 253387, which plan is dated 
April, 1988, last revised November 27, 1989, and is recorded 
in said Registry as Plan Number 5949. 



Article 25. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to accept the dedication of any street 
shown on a subdivision plat approved by the Planning Board, 
provided that such street has been constructed to 
applicable Town specifications as determined by the Board of 
Selectmen or their agent. 



Article 26. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Selectmen to administer, sell or otherwise dispose of any 
real estate acquired by tax title or otherwise, by pi±)lic 
auction, by advertised sealed bids, or may be otherwise 
disposed of as justice may require, pursuant to RSA 80:80 
and providing that if such property is to be sold at public 
auction, then the same shall be advertised sixty (60) days 
in advance of sale and again forty-five (45) days in advance 
of sale with notice thereof posted in three public places. 



17 



Article 27. To see if the Tcfwn will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to establish or amend fees as provided in 
RSA 41:9a, for the following purposes: issuance of any 
license or permit which is part of a regulatory program 
which has been established by vote of the Town; the use or 
occupancy of any public revenue-producing facility, as 
defined in RSA 33-B:l, VI, the establishment of which has 
been authorized by vote of the Town. Such fees or charges 
shall not exceed, in the case of licenses or permits, an 
amount reasonably calculated to cover the Town's regulatory, 
administrative and enforcement costs. 



Article 28. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to apply for, accept and expend, without 
further actin by Town meeting, money from the state, federal 
or other governmental unity or a private source which 
beccmes available furing the year, in accordance with RSA 
31:95-b. 

Article 29. To hear the reports of agents, auditors, 
committees, or any other officers heretofore chosen and pass 
any vote relating thereto. 



A true copy of Warrant-Attest 



Evelyn L. Palmer 

C. James Martel 

Donald J. Crate 

ENFIELD BOARD OF SELECIMEN 



18 



BUDGET FORM FOR TOWNS WHICH HAVE ADOPTED THE 
PROVISIONS OF THE MUNICIPAL BUDGET LAW 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE ADMINISTRATION 
MUNICIPAL SERVICES DIVISION 




BUDGET OF THE TOWN 



OF 



ENFIELD 



N.H. 



Appropriations and Estimates of Revenue for the Ensuing Year January 1 , 1 991 to December 31 , 1 991 or for Fiscal Year 
From 19 to 19 



THIS BUDGET SHALL BE POSTED WITH THE TOWN WARRANT 

RSA 31:95 and 32:5 

~ Pats, February 14, 199 1 










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19 





• '-'■ '^ - 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


PURPOSES OF APPROPRIATION 

(RSA31:4) 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT 


Actual 

Appropriations 

1990 

(1990.91) 

(omit cents) 


Actual 

Expendlturea 

1990 

(1990-91) 

(omit cents) 


Selectmen's 
Budget 

1991 

(1991-92) 

(omit cents) 


Budget Committee | 


Recommended 

1991 

(1991-92) 

(omit cents) 


Not 

Recommended 

(omit cents) 


1 Town Officers" Salary/ Res. TaxFee: 


45,162 


44,798 


50,785 


50,785 




2 


Town Officers' Expenses/ Audi t/ Ma; 


160,526 


157,484 


162,093 


155,363 




3 


Bection and Registration Expenses 


4,710 


2,937 


2,507 


2,507 




4 


Cemeteries 


19,227 


17,008 


16,424 


15,024 




5 


General Government Buildings 


68,875 


65,814 


93,685 


85,213 




6 


Reappraisal of Property 


26,000 


25,068 


9,000 


9,000 




7 


Planning and Zoning 


41,850 


22,072 


30,928 


29,128 




8 


Legal Expenses 


18,000 


17,174 


18,000 


18,000 




9 


Advertising and Regional Association 


23,024 


23,024 


25,975 


25,519 




10 


Contingency Fund 












PUBUC SAFETY 












11 


Police Department 


187.751 


193,663 


217,822 


217,274 




12 


Fire Department 


35,875 


42,235 


50,611 


45,583 




13 


€iv)HJe*efl9e Dispatch 


21,000 


21,393 


24,953 


24,953 




14 


Building Inspection 


5,600 


5,195 


6,613 


6,613 




HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES 












15 


Town Maintenance 












16 


General Highway Department Expenses 


373.537 


373.610 


404.685 


403,405 




17 


Street Lighting 


18.000 


16.148 


18.000 


18,000 




SANITATION 












18 


Solid Waste Disposal 












19 


Garbage Removal 


237.344 


1 99 .287 


216,610 


216,610 




HEALTH 












20 


Health Department 


son 


237 


6.363 


6,363 




21 


Hospitals and Ambulances 


1 p.qsn 


13.619 


13.850 


13,750 




22 


Animal Control 












23 


Vital Statistics 












WELFARE 












24 


General Assistance 


39,741 


76,956 


70.776 


82,000 




25 


Old Age Assistance 












26 


Aid to the Disabled 












CULTURE AND RECREATION 












27 


Ubrary /Historical Recordi 


38.211 


38,024 


42,044 


37,119 




28 


Paries and Recreation 


10,688 


9,655 


12,905 


11,205 




29 


Patriotic Purposes 


400 


395 


400 


400 




30 


Conservation Commission 


600 


297 


912 


700 




DEBT SERVICE 












31 


Principal of Long-Term Bonds & Notes 


132.163 


132.163 


147,963 


147,963 




32 


Intere^ Expense — Long-Term Bonds & Notes 


112.510 


112,510 


108,975 


108,975 




33 


Interest Expense — Tax Anticipation Notes 


1 45.000 


106 .669 


105,000 


1 05 ,00C 




34 


Interest Expense — Other Temporary Loans 












35 


Fiscal Charges on Debt 


4,000 


851 


3,000 


3,00C 




CAPITAL OUTLAY 












36 


Total Misc. Attach. A 


333,142 


259,778 


123,001 


123,001 




37 


Soec. Warrant Art.Att.B 


25,000 


25,000 


378,000 


378,000 




OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 






1 1! 1 


3B 


Payments to Capital Reserve Funds: 


18 ,000 


18 ,000 


1 13,000 


8,000ll 1 


39 




II 1! 




40 


General Fund Trust (RSA 31:19-a) 












MISCELLANEOUS 


1 





d 







41 


Municipal Water Depanment 


68,907 


57,958 


73,192 


73,192 




42 


Municipal Sewer Department 


99,632 


113,636 


113,770 


113,770 




43 


Municipal Electric Department 















FICA. Retirement & Pension Contributions 


46,658 


46,722 


57,689 


57,689 




44 


Insurance 


148,026 


154,223 


186,836 


186,836 




45 


Unemployment Compensation 


1,500 


1,643 


1,50C 


1,500 




46 


TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 


2,524,110 


2,395,276 


2,807,867 


2,781,440 





20 



SOURCES OF REVENUE 
TAXES 


Estimated 
Revenues 

1990 
(1990-91) 
(omit cents) 


Actual 
Revenues 

1990 

(1990-91) 

(omit cents) 


Selectmen's 
Budget 

1991 

(1991-92) 

(omit cents) 


Estimated 
Revenues 

1991 

(1991-92) 

(omit cents) 


47 Resident Taxes 


28,330 


26,477 


26,477 


26,4771 


48 National Bank Stock Taxes 











—J 


49 Yield Taxes 


10,000 


7,278 


7,278 


7,278 


50 Interest and Penaltjes on Taxes 


16,000 


15,431 


15,431 


15.431) 


51 Inventory Penalties 







1 


52 Land Use Change Tax 


1,880 


2,492 


2,492 


2,4921 


INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES-STATE 






1 




i 53 Sharea Revenue-Block Grant II 5 2,031 


52,031'! 52,031 


52.03^ 


54 Hiahway Block Grant 


68.314 


66,434 


67.858 


67,858 


55 Railroad Tax 












56 State Aid Water Pollution Proiects 


168,018 


168.018 


112,002 


112,002 


PAYMENT IN LIEU OF TAXES: 










57 State-Federal Forest Land/Recreation Land/Rood Land 


2SR 


2S8 


758 


258 


58 Other (MS-1,p.2. lines 20-22) Bns . Profits Tax 


71 .fi17 


71 .617 


71 .617 


71 .617 


59 Other Reimbursements Enerqy Audit/Police 







13,650 


13,650 


INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES-FEDERAL 










60 










UCENSES AND PERMITS 










61 Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 


292,211 


286,287 


286,287 


286,287 


62 Dog Licenses 


1,110 


1,434 


1,434 


1,434 


63 Business Licenses. Permits and Rling Fees 


6,993 


9,195 


9,195 


9,19 = 


CHARGES FOR SERVICES 










64 Income From Departments 


39.916 


38,589 


38,589 


38,589 


65 Rent of Tovvn Property 


3.000 


3.211 


3,211 


3,211 


MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 










66 Interests on Deposits 


90,000 


83,033 


83,033 


83,033 


67 Sale of Tovm Property 


400 


385 


2,885 


2,885 


68 Insurance Dividends /Reimbursemeni 


27,158 


27,983 


27,983 


27,983 


OTHER RNANQNG SOURCES 










69 Proceeds of Bonds and Long-Term Notes 








378,000 


378. OOC 


70 Income frcim Water and Sawer Departments 


228,105 


215,419 


244,462 


244,462 


71 Withdrawals from Capital Resenre 


278,142 


202,410 


119,476 


119,476 


72 Withdrawals from General Fund Trusts 














73 Income from Trust Funds 


2,060 


1,562 


1,562 


1,562 


74 Fund Balance 


499,765 


499,765 


147,677 


148,867 


75 TOTAL REVENUES AND CREDITS 


1,835,308 


1,729,309 


1,662,888 


1,664,078 


Total Appropriations (line 46) 


$ 2,781,440 


Less: Amount of Estimated Revenues, Exclusive of Taxes (Line 75) 


1,664,078 


Amount of Taxes to be Raised (Exclusive of School and County Taxes) 

BUDGET OF THE TOWN OF 


S 1.117,362 


ENFIELD , N.H. 


BUDGET FOR TOWNS WHICH 1 
OF THE MUNIC 


4AVE ADOPT 
PAL BUDGE 


ED THE PROVISIONS 
FLAW 


.-• V7../' 



21 



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STUMMZVRY HSrVHaSTTOFtY 

Value of Land 

Current Use ^ $ 582,640 

Residential 117 , 109 , 300 

Comnercial/Industrial 9,349,700 

Total Land $127,041,640 

Value of Buildings 

Residential $100, 669 , 100 

Manufactured Housing 6,412,250 

Corarnercial/Industrial 10,059,800 

■Itotal Buildings $117,141,150 

Public Utilities $ 2,190,543 

TOTAL VnLUATIC3N BEPC»E EXEMPTICWS $246,373,333 



Blind Exerrptions 73,400 

Elderly Exenptions 2,583,300 

Total Dollar Amount of Exean[ptions $ 2,656,700 



NET VALUATION OS WHICH THE TAX 

RATE IS CXWPUTED $243,716,633 



Total Veterans' Tax Credits 40,000 

Enfield Eastinan Village District 

Precinct Valuation $ 7,191,000 



23 



1 Q 9 o ST.zvi'EayrFnsrT 

OF .A:E>F»FtOE>R.ZL?Vl?XO]SrS , 
TJ^XES .ASSESSED & TAJK: FLA.TE 



Total 
impropriations 



Town 

County 

School District 

Totals 

Eastitian Village 
District Precinct 



9,112 



Taxes 
Assessed 



$2,524,110 $ 801,151 

235,372 230,970 

2,870,898 2,799,104 

$5,630,380 $3,831,225 



9,133 



Tax Rate per 
$1,000 value 

$ 3.28 

.95 

11.49 
$15.72 

1.27 



(To be collected and remitted to the Precinct) 



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BlAjl^z^jstce sheet 

.ASSETS 

December 31, 1990 
CASH: 

In Hands of Treasurer 
INVESTMENTS : 



CAPITAL RESERVE FUNDS 
New Road Equipnent 
Lakeview Cemetery Acquisition 
Lockehaven Cemetery 
Town Duirp 
Police Cruiser 
Municipal Buildings 
Town Reappraisal 
Sewerage Study 
Ambulance 
Water Department 
Tax Mapping 
Whitney Hall 
Fire Department 
New Highway Trucks 
Fire Truck Fund 

TOTAL: 

TAXES: 

Unredeemed Taxes 
Uncollected Taxes 
Uncollected Sewer Rent Assess, 
Uncollected Water Rent Assess, 

TOTAL: 

DUE FROM OTHER FUNDS: 

Loan to Sewer Project 

TOTAL ASSETS 



650.66 

50,015.94 

3,543.88 

5,422.20 

299.32 

37,547.11 

1,491.38 

211.44 

17,143.62 

47,175.94 

174.61 

17,774.99 

174.39 

860.93 

7,531.77 



219,228.39 

683,852.13 

5,831.10 

3,079.28 



$651,367.01 



189,948.18 



911,990.91 

194,219.02 
$1,947,525.12 



28 



Fund Balance: December 31, 1989 589,373.85 

Fund Balance: December 31, 1990 211,666.75 

CHANGE IN FINANCIAL CONDITION 377,707.10 



T^T XT .T XKJrrFT. SHEET 
I_. ZL?\B II.. X T IE S 

December 31, 1990 

ACCOUNTS OWED BY TOWN: 

Accounts Payable 63,479.50 
Unexpended balances 

(of bond funds) 43,954.19 

Uncollected Sewer Rent Assess. 5,831.22 

Uncollected Water Rent Assess . 3 , 079 . 28 
Dog Licenses fees collected 

(not remitted) 84.00 

School District Taxes Payable 1,429,482.00 
Capital Reserve Accounts 

(offsets a similar 

asset account) 189,948.18 

TOTAL LIABILITIES $1,735,858.37 

Fund Balance - Current Surplus 211,666.75 



29 



BALANCE C»I HAND JANUARY 1, 1990 $ 368,304.95 

INCOME: 

EPA $ 243,090.00 

Interest 24,621.01 

$ 636,015.96 

EXPENSES: 

Loan repayment: 

Enfield General Fund $ 300,000.00 

Auditor's Expense 1,300.00 

City of Lebanon 105.76 

Consultant - Peter G. Russell 290.00 

Bank Service Charge 5.00 

301,700.76 

BALANCE ON HAND DECEMBER 31, 1990 $ 334,315.20 



30 



SCHEDUXJE OF rjOlSTG — TERlVl 

As of December 31, 1990 



BONDS OUTSTANDING: 

1985 Sewer Bond 600,000 

1987 Water Iirprovement Bond (refunded) 330,000 

1988 Sewer Bond 135,000 

1989 Sewer Bond 337,037 
1989 Municipal Bond (Fire Truck & 

Re-appraisal ) 200 , 000 



TOTAL BCM)S OUTSTANDING 1,602,037 

TOTAL LONG-TERM INDEBTEDNESS $1,602,037 



RECONCILIATION OF OUTSTANDING 
LONG-TERM INDEBTEDNESS 



OUTSTANDING LC^G-TERM DEBT 1/1/91 1,602,037 

DEBT INCURRED DURING FISCAL YEAR 











1,833,400 


DEBT Rh'TIRED DURING 


FISCAL 


YEAR 






Back hoe loan 






24,200 




1985 Sewer Bond 






40,000 




1987 Water Bond 






35,000 




99,200 










1988 Sewer Bond 






20,000 




1989 Sewer Bond 






12,963 





132,163 
OUTSTANDING DEBT DECEMBER 31, 1990 $1,602,037 



31 



SCHEDUI^E OF TOWN E>ROr>ER.'rY 

As of December 31, 1990 



ENFIEU) CENTER TOWN HALL: 

Land and Buildings $ 122,800 

Furniture and Equipment 2,000 

WHITNEY HALL, INCliUDING LIBRARY: 

Land and Buildings 357,000 

Furniture and Equipment 125,000 

Police Department Equipment 37,500 

FIRE DEPARIMENT: 

Lands and Buildings 234,100 

Equipment 288,000 

HIGHWAY ISPARTMENT 

Lands and Buildings 237,800 

Equipment 476,000 

Materials and Supplies 10,000 

PARKS, CXMCNS & PLAYGROUNDS 416,300 

WATER SUPPLY FACILITIES 1,500,000 

SEWER FACILITIES 4,000, 000 

CEMETERIES 269,500 

MISC. PARCELS 673,700 

TOTAL: $8,749,700 



32 



iJSTDEiPEisrDHiisrT .?\.ur>iTOR. ' s re:e>or.t 



To the Members of 

the Board of Selectmen 
Town of Enfield 
Enfield, New Hanpshire 



We have audited the acconpanying general purpose financial 
statements of the Town of Enfield and the combining and 
individual fund financial statements of the Town as of and 
for the year ended December 31, 1989. These financial 
statements are the responsibility of the Town's management. 
Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these 
financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with generally accepted 
auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan 
and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about 
whether the financial statements are free of material 
misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, 
evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the 
financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the 
accounting principles used and significant estinnates made by 
management, as well as evaluating the overall financial 
statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides 
a reasonable basis for our opinion. 

The general purpose financial statements referred to above 
do not include the General Fixed Asset Group of Accounts, 
which should be included to conform with generally accepted 
accounting principles. The amount that should be recorded 
in the General Fixed Asset Account Group is not known. 

In our opinion, except that omission of the General Fixed 
Asset Group of Accounts results in an incorrplete 
presentation, as esq^lain^i in the above paragraph, the 
general purpose financial statements referred to above 
present fairly, in all material respects, the financial 
position of the Town of Enfield at December 31, 1989, and 
the results of its operations for the year then ended, in 
conformity with generally accepted accounting principles. 



33 



Also, in our opinion, the combining and individual fund 
financial statements referred to above present fairly, in 
all material respects, the financial position of each of the 
individual funds of the Town at December 31, 1989, and the 
results of operations of such funds for the year then ended, 
in confonnity with generally accepted accounting principles. 



PLODZIK & SANDERSON 
Professional Association 
May 3, 1990 



34 



December 31, 1990 

311 1990 Dog Licenses $ 1,368.50 

Group License 13.00 

Penalties 52.00 

1,433.50 

Fees Collected and Remitted to Treasurer 6,117.00 

1990 Motor Vehicle Permits, 4723 Issued 286.287.00 
TOTAL $293,837.50 

Respectfully Sutmitted, 
Ilene P. Reed, Town Clerk 



35 



t.a:k: co: 



iCTOR. • s re:e>or.t 



1990 1989 



Property Tax 


$3, 


807,078.14 


$714,358.94 


Resident Tax 




31,310.00 


6,620.00 


Yield Tax 




7,278.19 


184.16 


Tiand Use Change Tax 




4,510.00 


2,491.50 


Boat Permit Fees 




2,839.87 




Overpayments 








a/c Prop. Tax 




348.83 




Interest 




1,121.98 


4,789.87 


Penalties -Res . Tax 




81.00 


236.00 


TOTAL DEBITS 


$3, 


854,568.01 


$728,680.47 


REMI'i'l'KD TO TREASURER 








Property Tax 


$3, 


,133,298.84 


$695,212.34 


Resident Tax 




23,800.00 


2,360.00 


Yield Tax 




7,278.19 




Tiand Use Change Tax 






2,491.50 


Boat Pennit Fees 




2,839.87 




Interest 




1,121.98 


4,789.87 


Penalties -Res . Tax 




81.00 


236.00 




$3. 


,168,419.88 


$705,089.71 


ABA'l'hMENTS 








Property Tax 




515.98 


23,406.60 


Resident Tax 




1,780.00 




UNCOTTFCTKD TAXES 








Property Tax 




673,612.15 




Resident Tax 




5,730.00 




Land Use Change Tax 




4,510.00 




Yield Tax 






184.16 




$3. 


,854,568.01 


$728,680.47 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Carol C. Keating, Tax Collector 



36 



As of December 31, 1990 



Unredeoned Taxes 
Sold to Town 
Interest & Cost 
Overpayments 

TOTAL DEBITS 



1989 



$373,360.10 

13,615.17 

11.00 



1988 



1987 



$ 91,598.98 $ 8,700.89 
14,242.64 3,339.65 



$386,986.27 $105,841.62 $12,040.54 



REMITTED TO 
TE?EASURER 

Redearptions 
Interest & Costs 

After Sale 
Abatements 
Deeded to Town 
Unredeemed Tax 



$193,154.30 

13,615.17 
648.25 

179,568.55 



$ 51,939.14 $ 8,700.89 
14,242.64 3,339.65 

39,659.84 



$386,986.27 $105,841.62 $12,040.54 



Respectfully subnitted, 

Carol C. Keating, Tax Collector 
Carolee T. Hi^Dee, Deputy 



37 



CXDT .T .T^CTxoisrs re:for.t 
E>H:F»^\R.iiyEEasrrs 



TO COTiTiKCT: 


SEWER 


WATER 


COMBINED 


1989 Uncollected 


3,666.40 


3,351.85 




Customer charges 


83,714.13 


101,289.09 




Late penalties 


3,037.65 


2,814.72 




Net adjustments 


24,488.69 


1,774.67 




Total to collect 


114,592.32 


109,544.88 


224,137.20 


PAYMEnsrrs 








CUhLKCrKD: 


SEWER 


WATER 


COIBINED 


Customer charges 


84,447.88 


101,895.61 




Late penalties 


2,130.42 


2,689.49 




General repairs 


0.00 


25.00 




Meter repairs 


83.50 


316.75 




Return check fees 


10.00 


20.00 




Collection fees 


0.00 


0.00 




Hydrant maintenance 


NA 


1,518.75 




LSV sewer charges 


19,255.33 


NA 




LSV late fees 


1,020.97 


NA 




LSV odor control 


1,439.12 


NA 




LSV collection fees 


374.00 


NA 




Total 


108,761.22 


106,465.60 


215,226.82 


Uncollected 


5,831.10 


3,079.28 


8,910.38 




224,137.20 





TOTAL CASH COLLECTED: 

Payments collected $ 215, 226 . 82 

Pre-payments collected 172 . 20 

Total cash collected $ 215, 399 . 02 



Darla Taylor 
Accounts Manager 



38 



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40 



TAXES 

Property Taxes $ 4,113,661 

Resident Taxes 26,477 

Yield Taxes 9,770 

Interest & Penalties on Taxes 15,431 

TOTAL TAXES COLLECT. & REMIT. 4,165,339 

INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVENUES - STATE 

Shared Revenue Block Grant 149,843 

Highway Block Grant 66,434 

State - Federal Forest Land 258 
State Aid Water Pollution Projects 168,018 

TOTAL INTERGOVT. REV. - STATE 384,553 

LICENSES & PERMITS 

Motor Vehicle Pennits 286,287 

Dog Licenses 1,433 
Business Licenses/Permits /Filing Fees 4,595 

Boat Tax 2,840 

Other Licenses /Pennits /Fees 1,760 

TOTAL LICENSES & PERMITS 296,915 

CHARGES FOR SERVICES 

Income from Depts. 38,544 

Rent of Town Property 3,211 

TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES 41,755 

MISCELLAIEXXJS REVENUES 

General Fund 45 

Interest and Deposits 83,032 

Sale of Town Property 385 

Insurance Dividends /Reimbursements 27,983 

Sewer Project Loan Repayment 300,000 

TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE 411,445 



41 



OTHER FINANCING SERVICES 

Income Water Department 106,596 

Income Sewer Department 108,823 

Withdrawal from Capital Reserves 202,410 
Withdrawal from General Fund Trusts 1,562 
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SERVICES 419,391 

NC»I-REVENUE RECEIPTS 

Tax Anticipation Notes 2,500,000 

TOTAL NON-REVENUE RECEIPTS 2,500,000 

UNCLASSIFIED SPECIAL REVENUES 

Flood Damages 28,427 

28,427 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FICM ALL SERVICES 8,247,825 



42 



GENE3^AL GOVERIMElKr 

Town Officer's Salaries 44,798 

Town Officer's Expenses 144,784 

Elections & Registrations 2,937 

Cemeteries 17 , 008 

General Govt. Buildings 64,954 

Reappraisal of Property 18,068 

Planning & Zoning 22,072 

Legal E3q)enses /Damages 17,174 

Regional Associations 23,024 

Required Audit 8,590 

Tax Mapping 1,104 
TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



364,513 



PUBLIC SAFETY 

Police Department 193,663 

Fire Department 33,443 

Dispatch Services 21,393 

Building Inspection 5,195 

TOTAL PUBLIC SAFETY 253,694 

HIGHNAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES 

General Highway Dept. Expenses 373,610 
Street Lighting 16,148 

TOTAL HWYS., STREETS & BRIDGES 389,758 

SANITATIGN 

Garbage Removal 199,287 

TOTAL SANITATION 199,287 

HEALTH 

Health Department 236 

Ambulance 13,619 

TOTAL HEALTH 13,855 

WELFARE 

General Assistance 76,956 

TOTAL WELFARE 76,956 



43 



CULTURE & RECa^EAIION 

Library 37,036 

Parks and Recreation 9,655 

Patriotic Purposes 395 

Conservation Coniraission 297 

Historical Records 563 
TOTAL CULTURE & RECREATION 47,946 

DEBT SERVICE 

Prin. of Long Terro Bonds & Notes 132,163 

Int. Exp. Long Term Bonds & Notes 112,510 

Int. Exp. Tax Anticipation Notes 106,699 

Fiscal Charges on Debt 851 
TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 352,223 



108,330 



CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Fire Truck ^ ,^^^ 

Water Inprovements 41,399 

Town Reappraisal 21,572 

Police Cruiser 13,061 

1 Ton Duitp 29,868 

Chipper 14,465 

Whitney Hall 4,000 
Union Street Station 
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY 



12,500 



245,195 



OPERATING TRANSFERS OUT 
PAYMENTS TO CAPITAL RESERVE FUNDS 

Ambulance 3,000 

Municipal Buildings 15,000 

TOTAL OPERATING TE^ANSFERS OUT 18,000 

SPECIAL fCU^RANT ARTICLfS 5,359 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Municipal Water Department 57,458 

Municipal Sewer Department 112,636 

FICA, Ret.S Pension Contributions 46,722 

Insurance 153,223 

Unertployment Conp. 1,643 

TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS 37 1 , 682 



44 



UNCLASSIFIED 

Payments - Tax Anticipation Notes 2,500,000 

Taxes Bought by Town 373,360 

Discounts, Abatements, Refunds 27,507 

Reappraisal from Bond Issue 80,000 

Fire Truck from Bond Issue 20,546 

CIP from 1989 encurnbrances 5,860 

Bad Check Charges 102 

Flood Damages from Special Revenue 20,240 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED 3,027,616 

PAXME31TS TO 0THE31 GOfVERNMENTS 

To State of N.H. 1,599 

Taxes paid to Grafton County 235,372 

Pmts. to Eastinan Village District 9,133 

Taxes paid to School District 2,729,652 

TOTAL PMTS. OTHER GOVERNMENTS 2,975,756 

TOTAL PAYMENTS 8,341,839 



r>E]T.Z^II_.H:33 ST.A.TEIMEIISPX' 

TRXES 

Property Taxes - Current Year 3,133,456.78 

Property Taxes - Previous Year 695,212.34 

Resident Taxes - Current Year 23,881.00 

Resident Taxes - Previous Year 2,596.00 

Yield Taxes - Current Year 7,278.19 

Land Use Change 2,491.50 

Interest and Penalties on Taxes 15,431.47 

Tax Sales /Liens Redeemed 284,991.79 
TOTAL TAXES 4,165,339.07 

DrEERO0fVERI@4EM£AL REVENUES - STATE 

Shared Government Block Grant 149,843.60 

Highway Block Grant 66,433.71 
State - Federal Forest Land 257.76 

State Aid Water Pollution Projects 168,018.00 
TOTAL INTERGOVT. REV. - STATE 384,553.07 

LICENSES AND PETOflTS 

Motor Vehicle Permit Fees 286,287.00 

Marriage License Fees 1,760.00 

Dog Licenses 1,433.50 

Business Licenses /Perrnits /Filing Fees 4,357.00 
Boat Permit Fees 2,839.87 

Other Licenses, Permts & Fees 

Current Use i^lications 24.00 

Junk Yard Licenses 25.00 

Games of Chance Licenses 50.00 

Gun Sale License 10.00 

Building Permits 129.00 

238.00 
TOTAL LICENSES AND PERMITS 296,915.37 

C!HAR££S FOR SERVICES 

Income from Departments: 

Town Officers Expenses 700.46 

Elections & Registrations 170.00 

Planning Board 23,463.50 

Zoning Board 392.50 

Police Department 7,599.54 

Highway Department 2,636.55 



Conservation 3.50 

Welfare 401.33 

Parks & Recreation 2,928.80 

Historical Records 2.50 

FICA/Retirement 245.23 

TOTAL CHARGES FOR SERVICES 38,543.91 



WSnXL OF TCHm PBDFERn 3,210.60 

MISCEIIANEXXJS REVENUES 

General Fund 44.95 

Interest on Deposits 83,032.59 

Sale of Town Property 385.00 
Insurance Dividends /Reimbursements 27,982.68 

Loan Repayment-Sewer Project 300,000.00 
TOTAL MISCELLANEOUS REVENUES 411,445.22 

OTHER FDCVNCINGr SOURCES 

Income from Water Department 106,595.62 

Income from Sewer Department 108,823.40 

Withdrawal from Capital Reserves: 

Water Department Improvement Fund 56,008.00 
Fire Truck Fund 108,330.00 

Reappraisal 21,572.00 

Whitney Hall Fund 4,000.00 

Municipal Building Fund 12,500.00 

Withdrawal from General Fund Trusts? 
CeoT^tery Perpetual Care 1,193.03 
Johnson & Gage Fund 369.19 

1,562.22 
TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES 419,391.24 

NON-REVENUE RECEIPTS 

Tax Anticipation Notes 2,500,000.00 

TOTAL NC»T-REVENUE RECEIPTS 2,500,000.00 

UNCIA5SIFIED SPECIAL REVENUES 

Flood Damages 28,427.00 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFED SPECIAL REVENUES 28,427.00 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FROM ALL SOURCES 8,247,825.48 

CASH ON HAND JANUARY 1, 1990 745,122.21 



GRAND TOTAL 8,992,947.69 

47 



33ETA.XT .T^ID ST-ZVZTEiyEElSrT OF E>?v^bnyiEisrTS 



GENERAL OOVERNMEINT 



(^TIGER'S SAIARIES: 



Selectmen, Chainnan 


1,790.00 




Selectmen, #2 


1,611.00 




Selectmen, #3 


1,611.00 




Town Clerk 


14,316.65 




Tax Collector 


12,621.13 




Treasurer 


4,680.00 




Deputy Town Clerk 


3,628.82 




Moderator 


165.00 




Supervisor /Checklist #1 


240.00 




Supervisor/Checklist #2 


240.00 




Supervisor/Checklist #3 


240.00 




Trustee/Trust Funds /Treasurer 


390.00 




Trustee/Trust Funds #2 


90.00 




Trustee/Trust Funds #3 


180.00 




Auditor #1 


415.00 




Overseer of Public Welfare 


2,219.00 




Fire Ward #1 


120.00 




Fire Ward #2 


120.00 




Fire Ward #3 


120.00 




TOTAL TCWN OFFICER'S SALARIES 




44,797.60 


TO^ OFFICER'S EXPENSES: 






Administrator 


36,985.63 




Clerk #1 


20,204.00 




Clerk #2 


17,842.00 




Clerk #3 


16,500.00 




Telephone 


4,682.40 




Dues to Associations 


1,509.07 




Printing Notices 


1,301.19 




Postage 


4,675.72 




Transfers /Deeds 


2,204.75 




Taw/Reference Books 


1,617.21 




Mileage/Conference Fees 


2,562.52 




Supplies 


6,147,89 




Bonds 


1,144.00 




New Equipment 


13,211.26 




Tax Bills/printed Forms 


812.90 





48 



Repair Equip. /Service Contracts 6,111.01 

Subscriptions 295.55 

Town Report 1,938.75 

Special Research Projects 2,000.00 

Miscellaneous 311.84 

Personnel Study 500.00 

Relocation 2,226.00 



TOTAL TCWN Oi-'i-'lCKR ' S EXPENSES 






144,783.69 


EI£Cn?IONS AND REGISTRATICMS : 








Posting Notices 




531.53 




Supplies 




193.80 




Ballots 




151.50 




Coan[puter Checklist 




525.00 




Supervisors E^q^enses 




244.95 




Moderator & Assistant 




265.00 




Ballot Clerks Salaries 


1 


,025.00 




TOTAL ETiECTIONS & REGISTRATIONS 






2,936.7 


CEMETERIES: 








Agent Salary- 




500.00 




Salaries: Full & Part Time 


12 


,324.15 




Equipient 


1 


,316.36 




Supplies 




609.07 




Repa 1 rs/Services 




376.98 




Ixakeview Ceanetery 




422.44 




Lockehaven Cemetery 


1 


,459.26 





TOTAL CEMETERIES 



17,008.26 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT BUIIDINGS: 

Whitney Hall Janitor 7,976.40 

Whitney Hall Iitproveraents 11,015.00 

Whitney Hall Repairs/Supplies 1,846.75 

Whitney Hall Electricity 3,624.22 

Center Hall Electricity 74.00 

Center Hall Repairs /Iirprovements 2,400.00 

Poulios Electricity 106.99 

Poulios Repairs/Improvements 434.92 

Town Shed 4,986.46 

MDore Building 1,950.00 

Union Street Station 20.54 

Center Station 73.47 

Huse Park 1,359.83 

Beach 875 . 38 

Water & Hydrant Rental 4,466.57 



Heating Fuel 


18,733.87 






Tiand Rental Ejq^enses 


839.72 






3 Sewer Connections 


3,682.10 






Police Facility Study 


487.38 






TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS 




64,953. 


60 


REAPPRAISAL OF PROPERTY 




18,067. 


81 


PLANNING AND lOtiniG BOARDS 








Secretary 


600.00 






Meetings /Hearing Records 


2,364.49 






Advertising 


1,213.72 






Printing 


486.93 






Supplies 


340.68 






Planning/Zoning Administrator 


11,373.70 






Telephone 


282.54 






Legal Fees 


2,213.60 






Planning Board Admin. Mileage 


280.00 






Postage 


963.90 






Law Books 


70.00 






Conference Fees /Training 


243.00 






T.ake Monitoring 


457.20 






Filing Mylars 


764.00 






ZBA Books /Materials 


284.74 






ZBA Public Hearing Records 


109.02 






ZBA Mileage 


24.50 






TOTAL PLANNING AND ZONING BOARDS 




22,072, 


.02 


l£GRL EXPENSES AND DAMA(SS 








Legal E^qjenses 


16,362.95 






Dog Care 


811.00 






TOTAL LEGAL EXPENSES & DAMAGES 




17,173 


.95 


TAX MAPPING 




1,104 


.00 


REQUIRED RUDIT 




8,590 


.50 



PUBLIC SAFETY 






POLICE DEPAB3MENT 






Salaries: Full Tiine 


116,362.68 




Salaries: Part Tirne 


13,207.14 




Salaries : Overtime 


9,942.65 




Clerk 


10,261.92 




Crossing Guard 


2,643.91 




New Hire/Physicals 


520.32 




Conference Fees/Dues 


480.00 




Supplies 


3,221.72 




Telephone 


3,680.35 




Postage 


378.50 




Vehicle Repairs 


5,767.98 




New Equipment 


7,923.55 




Equipiient Repairs 


3,183.01 




Uniforms 


4,063.81 




Gasoline 


7,195.64 




Training 


3,002.08 




Books /Periodicals 


1,483.90 




Miscellaneous 


344.00 




lUiMj POLICE DEPARTMENT EXPENSES 




193,663.16 


FIRE DFIFARIMENT 






Training 


342.00 




Firenian's Services 


15,274.00 




Telephone/Siren 


783.93 




Electricity 


1,635.90 




Dues 


50.00 




Supplies 


912.16 




Gasoline 


527.10 




Equi^iiient Repairs /Maintenance 


4,810.37 




Vehicle Maintenance 


2,594.41 




Clothing 


3,294.08 




New Equipiient 


3,219.33 




TOTAL FIRE DEPARTMENT 




33,443.28 


DISPATCH SERVICES 




21,393.00 


EUIIi)INS INSPECTION 






Bldg Inspector /Health Officer 


4,461.75 




Mileage/Conference Fees 


396.90 




Supplies 


336.33 





TOTAL BUILDING INSPECTION 



5,194.98 



51 



HIGHWAYS, STREETS & BRIDGES 



HICaiHAY DEPARTMENT 

Salaries 186,930.64 

Gas, Oil, Diesel 11,687.19 

Equipment Rental 8,974.40 

Supplies 7,006.42 

Salt & Sand 48,206.99 

Gravel & Crushed Stone 21,726.06 

Cold Patch, Oiling, Paving 43,637.21 

Vehicle Equipment/Maintenance 25,548.43 

Signs 2,201.48 

Electricity 1 , 497 . 39 

Telephone 676.74 

Bridges & Culverts 4,637.25 

Guard Rails 1,247.00 

Special Projects 9,632.81 
TOTAL HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT EXPENSES 



373,610.01 



STREET LIGHTING 



16,147.97 



SANITATION 



GARBA£S: EEM3VRL 

Solid Waste District 
Metal Removal 
Rubbish Hauler 
Lebanon Landfill 
Supplies 
Repairs 
New Equipment 
Stunp Duitp Attendant 
Collection Site Attendant 
Site Maintenance 
Legal Notices 
TOTAL GARBAGE REMOVAL 



986.35 

3,807.50 

74,424.48 

106,515.60 

522.94 
1,881.16 

799.57 
1,947.81 
7,261.76 
1,021.81 

118.42 



199,287.40 



52 



HEALTH 



HEAUm DEPMaMENT 



236.50 



AMBUIANCX: 

Gas 

Vehicle Maintenance 
Communications Systems 
Supplies 
Oxygen 

Continuing Education 
Golden Cross Coverage 
Miscellaneous 
Training/ Services 
TOTAL AMBULANCE 



563.82 
730.45 
466.36 

1,273.99 
329.09 
681.97 

1,419.00 
799.52 

7,354.80 



13,619.00 



REGIONAL ORSANIZATIONS 

Masccma Home Health Service 9,653.00 

Headrest 2,100.00 

Hospice of the Upper Valley, Inc. 525.00 

Advance Transit 4,778.00 
Ufper Valley Lake Sunapee Council 3,072.00 

Senior Citizens Council 2,896.00 
TOTAL REGIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 



23,024.00 



WELFARE 



OEKERAL ASSISTANCE 

Rent 

Food/Household 
FuelAJtilities 
Transportation 
RX 

Miscellaneous 
Sewer Hook-U^s 
Training 

Ccannmunity Action Program 
TOTAL GENERAL ASSISTANCE 



48,031.00 

15,043.21 

9,775.42 

862.00 

715.83 

59.96 

832.66 

95.40 

1.541.00 



76,956.48 



53 



CULTURE & RECREATION 



LIBRARY 






Salaries 


20,500.51 




Cleaning 
Books 


794.88 
12,857.37 




Supplies 

Repairs /New Equipment 

Telephone 

Insurance 


604.57 

475.41 
491,87 
530.00 




Dues 


40.00 




Miscellaneous 


111.80 




Shipping Charges 
Service Contracts 


300.00 
330.00 




TOTAL LIBRARY 




37,036.41 


PARKS & RECREATICW 






Swinming Instructor & Ass't. 


171.50 




Lifeguard 

Recreation Director Part-Time 


3,722.50 
1,235.63 




Electricity 
Telephone 
Repairs/Supplies 
Chanical Toilet Rental 


80.37 
192.70 
150.22 
255.00 




Advertising 
Old Heme Day 


139.10 
2,291.55 




Summer Program 
Little League 
Haloween 


291.20 
325.00 
365.77 




Ice Skating Party 
Sports Facility 
Miscellaneous 


24.58 

400.00 

9.58 




TOTAL PARKS & RECREATION 




9,654.70 



PATRIOTIC PURPOSES 



395.47 



CCaJSERVATI(»l CSCMCISSICW 

Association Dues 
Conference/Training 
Supplies 
TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



125.00 

40.00 

131.57 



296.57 



HISTORICAL RECORDS 

Clerk 
Supplies 
Books 
Dues 

Insurance 
TOTAL HISTORICAL RECORDS 



300.00 

157.82 

30.00 

25.00 

50.00 



562.82 



54 



raST SERVICE 



Principal Long Term Notes /Bonds 132,163.00 
Int. Expense Long Term Bonds/Notes 112,509.83 
Interest Tax Anticipation Notes 106,698.60 
Fiscal Charges on Debt 850.54 

TOTAL DEBT SERVICE 352,221.97 



CAPITAL OUTLAY 



Fire Truck (CRF) 108,330.00 

Water Dept. Iitprovement (CRF) 41,399.13 

Town Reappraisal (CRF) 21,572.00 

Police Cruiser 13,061.00 

1-Ton Dump Truck 29,868.00 

Chipper 14,465.00 

Whitney Hall (CRF) 4,000.00 

Mun Bldg Union St Station (CEIF) 12,500.00 
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY 245,195.13 



0PER7^IN& TRANSFERS OUT 



PAYMENTS TO CAPITAL RESERVES 

Ambulance 3 , 000 . 00 

Municipal Buildings 15,000.00 

TOTAL PAYMENTS TO CAPITAL RESERVES 18,000.00 



SPECIAL WARRANT ARTICLES 5 , 358 . 58 



MISCELLANEOUS 



MUNICIPAL WATER DEPARTMEin! 

Personnel 22,473.90 

Water Administration 3,768.15 

Supplies /Tools/Equipnent 2,272.09 

Systems Operations 28,943.95 
TOTAL MUNICIPAL WATER DEPARTMENT 57,458.09 



55 



MUNICIPAL SEHER DEPARIME3IT 

Personnel 21,506.58 

Administration 3,764.35 

Supplies /Tools/Equipnent 1,717.41 

Systems Operations 85,580.22 

LSV Inspections 67.43 
TOTAL MUNICIPAL SEWER DEPARTMENT 112,635.99 



PICA, RETIREMENT & PENSION CX3NTRIBUTIGNS 

Eirployer Paid FICA 34,844.67 

Employer Paid Medicare 879.10 

Enployer Paid Retirement 8,409.46 

ICMA Retirement 2,589.01 

TOTAL PICA, RETIREMENT & PENSIONS 46,722.24 



INSURANCE 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 53,147.00 

Life/Disability 4,799.54 

Workmen's Compensation 42,694.08 
Bldgs./Cont Equip. /Gen. Liability 46,982.00 

Public Officials Liability 5,150.00 

Deductibles 450.00 
TOTAL INSURANCE 153,222.62 

UNEI1PIOYMENT COMPENSATION INSURANCE 1,643.16 

UNCLASSIFIED 



TAX ANTICIPATION NOTES 2 , 500 , 000 . 00 

TAXES BOUGHT BY THE TCWN 373,360.10 

ABATEMENTS, REFUNDS 27,507.59 

REAPPRAISAL FROM BOND ISSUE 80,000.00 

FIRE TRUCK FROM BOND ISSUE 20,546.00 

CIP FRCM 1989 ENCUMBRANCES 5,860.00 

BAD CHECK CHARGES 102.00 

FLOOD DAMAGES FRCM SPECIAL REVENUE 20,240.00 
TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED 3,027,615.69 



56 



PAXMENTS TO OTHER GCVERII4ENTS 



PAYMENTS TO STATE OF NH 1,599.00 

PAYMENTS TO GRAFTON CDUNTY 235,372.00 
PAYMENTS TO EASIMAN VIUAGE DISTEIICT 9,133.00 
PAYMENTS TO SCHOOL DISTEIICT 

For Y^r 1989-90 1,288,236.00 

For Year 1990-91 1,441.416.00 
TOTAL PAYMENTS TO OTHER GOVERNMENTS 2,975,756.00 



TOTMi 8,341,839.43 



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59 



EJSTFXET.r) BUDGET COMiytl' 



The Budget Committee is conposed of nine members appointed 
by the Moderator plus a member of the Board of Selectmen 
designated by said board. The committee operates under the 
provisions of the municipal budget law and under rules 
adopted by the Commissioner of Revenue Administration. The 
members are listed elsewhere in the Town Report. 

The committee met eight times and held a public hearing in 
preparation for Town Meeting. Members attended regularly as 
is required and participated fully in decisions made in the 
course of the year. Relationships with the Town 
Administrator, the Selectmen, and Town Departments remain 
constructive and amicable. 

As predicted, the tax rate for 1990 w^as down considerably 
from the previous year although direct conparison of the two 
years is difficult because of the revaluation of all 
property that was corpleted this year. It will be hard to 
match this rate in 1991 because of the exceptional surplus 
that was carried over and appli^ in 1990. 



Franklyn W. Phillips, Chairnian 
Dwight Z. Marchetti, Vice Chainnan 



HHIJ\I_.TM OFF I CER. 



Building permts were issued for 17 single family homes, 22 
garages, 5 mobile homes, 22 additions, 26 renovations, 23 
storage buildings, 25 decks, and 8 permits were renewed. 
The Public Utilities Commission issued 38 Energy Codes in 
the Town of Enfield. 

My time has been divided into 268 hours for Building 
Inspector and 139 hours as Health Officer. 

I have been working with many people in the State 
government, looking into water guality and health issues. 

As Building Inspector for the Town, I am a member of the New 
Haiipshire Building Officials Association. I have attended a 
workshop on 1990 National Electrical Code changes. I also 
attended a workshop on State Plumbing Code changes for 1990. 

I started in late June as Building Inspector/Health Officer 
and I look forward to serving the citizens of Enfield. 



Howard Adams 



61 



coisrsER^/^VT ION CQiyiMi s s loisr 

The year just past saw the Conmission engaged in several 
initiatives for which we had time available due to the 
economic recession. Dredge and Fill applications were 
fewer, Notices of Intent to Cut (tirnber) totaled 22 for 697 
acres, with 212 acres intended for development. 

The Selectmen asked us to come up with a Class VI Road 
policy for their consideration. A subcommittee spent many 
hours on research, and after much debate, the entire 
Commission voted for one which was submitted in July. 

The Wetlands Subcommittee increased our information base in 
both the physical and legal aspects. In 1991 some maps will 
be prepared, but the main areas of activity will be the 
research of candidate parcels of land for designation as 
prime wetlands, and public education through articles, 
pairphlets, workshops and personal contact. 

The Trails Subcommittee now has the entire route of the 
Shaker Mountain Trail under contract except for the Smith 
Pond area. When and if the route is secured, volunteers 
will clear the trail and stabilize it one section at a time. 

The Commission aijns to be more available and helpful to the 
public, and to work more closely with the other boards and 
officers who have the care of the Town's natural resources 
in their keeping. We invite interest and ideas from the 
public, and competent assistance is always welcome. We can 
be reached through the Town Offices, and our regular meeting 
is 7;00 pm., the first Thursday of each month, at Whitney 
Hall. 

In this, as in so many other needful tasks, thanks are due 
to the many volunteers who willingly sacrifice their 
personal leisure time for the good of their community. 
Civilization depends on this, for our common culture is the 
result of our selflessness. I have encountered many such 
people in this and many other institutions, and feel 
grateful and privileged to work with them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Craig Sanborn 



62 



Due to the fact that Enfield is a grc3wing community, 
the Enfield Fast Squad had done a great deal of "running" 
this year. As of December 20th we had responded to 168 
calls as well as unnuinbered responses for stand by at fire 
scenes. In 1989 we responded to 145 runs and in 1982 we 
had 109 runs. Your need for us is certainly rising. 

We were also kept quite busy with neintaining our 
certifications. This year 8 squad members re-certified. 
Our training sessions have included such topics as diabetic 
conditions, water rescue, trauma assessments and 
hypothermia. Raymond and Roger Dauphinais and Lencie 
Raynor attended a Hazardous Material seminar at Dartmouth 
to gain extra knowledge for the squad. Many of us also 
attended monthly critiques at Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical 
Center, as well as took part in a mock disaster drill in 
Hanover at CRREL. 

The Enfield Fast Squad is also pleased to have 
supported the Drug-Free Mascoma High School Graduation 
Party and were on the scene again at the annual Field 
Hockey Jamboree held at the Mascoma High School playing 
field. You also had the opportunity to see us in the Old 
Home Day Parade and afterwards tour the ambulance at Huse 
Park. We also provided our own annual community CPR course 
in i^ril. 

Because of the "wanted" article in the Mascoma 
Messenger, at least 20 people have demonstrated interest in 
taking an E.M.T. course and joining our ranks. This year, 
even with the increase of runs, service was provided 
basically by nine VERY ACTIVE people. 



63 



Officers at this time are: 



E.M.T. Lencie V. Raynor, Pres. 

E.M.T. Roger Dauphinais, Vice-Pres. 

E.M.T. Pauline Laughlin, Sec. 

E.M.T. Charles Harrington, Treas. 

E.M.T. Richard Holmes, Training Officer 



Other members include: 



Jerry Bardwell, E.M.T. - P 
Raymond Dauphinais, E.M.T. 
Joel Levine, E.M.T. 
John Markowitz, 1st Responder 
Bruce Turner, E.M.T. 



If you have any guestions please contact ANY sguad 
member or write Enfield Fast Sguad, P.O. Box 345, Enfield, 
N.H., 03748. 



Respectfully Submitted 
Lencie V. Raynor, Pres. 
E.F.S. 



64 



HnSTF'IEUZ) FIRE DEF^ARnyTEHSTT 
AlSIlsnUAI.. REr>OR.T 

Once again the Enfield Fire Department has had a very active 
year. The Department responded to a total of 105 calls in 
the following categories: 

Alarm Activations 15 

Car Accidents 10 

Car Fires 17 

Chimney Fires 11 

Grass Fires 4 

Mutual Aid 14 

Structures 5 

Misc 29 

The annual yard sale held by the volunteer fire fighters 
raised approximately $1,500 in 1990. The proceeds were used 
for partial payment of the rescue boat and an IBM conputer 
system that will assist the department in maintaining 
various records. This system enables our department to be 
standardized with other departments nation wide. The 
department is currently researching the possibility of 
acquiring a modem that will allow the direct access to 
Chemtrac, an organization that assists departments in 
hazardous waste spills. We wish to extend our gratitude to 
all those who participated in this fund raising project. 

The Enfield Center Fire Fighters took delivery of a new fire 
engine this year. The second engine should arrive at the 
Union Street Station in early March of 1991. The Union 
Street engine sports a five man enclosed cab, which will 
allow for greater safety and clearer communications. 

Several fire fighters have coirpleted the State of New 
Hampshire Level One Certification Course. One fire fighter 
has coiTpleted the State of New Hanpshire Career 
Certification Course. These courses are essential to the 
department as they provide our volunteers with the 
information necessary to determine and utilize proper safety 
procedures as well as ventilation techniques and the most 
effective use of the equipnent we possess. 



Donald A. Crate 
Fire Chief 



65 



H I STOR.I CAI_. RECORJDS 



During 1990 there have been many requests for genealogical 
infonriation, most of which I have been able to supply. The 
scrap books which Mrs. Nellie Pierce made have been kept up- 
to-date with current items. 

There were many Finnish families in Enfield in the late 
1800 's and early 1900 's, and I have started to collect 
information and photos about them. 

Presently I am atterrpting to acquire photos of Enfield homes 
and other buildings, with whatever information known about 
their history. Any donations will be most welcome. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Jeanette Haarala 
Town Historian 



66 



]y[U2Srid]E>AI_. IaZZVTER- I^tTD SEWER. 

DE:E>AR.i!iy[Eiisrrs 

WATER SYSTEM: The municipal water system, constructed in 
1903 and partially renovated in 1983, is supplied by two 
main production wells: Prior I, rated at 70 gallons per 
minute and located off Love joy Brook Road, and Marsh well, 
rated at 45 gallons per minute and located off Moose 
Mountain Road in Canaan. A third well. Prior II, is used as 
a backup source and is rated at 32 gallons per minute. The 
old Harris Brook reservoir is used only as an emergency fire 
-fighting supply. Fresh water is stored for consuitption and 
as a fire-fighting supply in a 500,000 gallon concrete tank 
located on Dry Bridge Hill, ^proximately 12 miles of iron 
water main distribute drinking water to 1500-1600 persons 
through 437 service connections. No disinfection or other 
treatments have been required to date. The water is not 
fluoridated. Customers use approximately 76,500 gallons of 
water per day. The average water bill for a single family 
hone is $167.15 per year with an average consuirption of 
43,900 gallons. 

SEWER SYSTEM: The municipal sewer system, placed on line in 
1988, collects wastewater from 252 buildings in the Enfield 
Village area, 41 along Rt. 4A, and approximately 25 in the 
Lower Shaker Village developnent. The approxiiriately 65,000 
gallons per day of wastewater is then punped by 4 lift 
stations to the City of Lebanon wastewater treatment plant 
which in turn discharges the treated effluent to the 
Connecticut River. The average sewer bill for a single 
family home is $194.23 per year, based on an average 
discharge of 41,200 gallons per year. 

WATER AND SEWER DEPARTMENT: Overall authority and 
responsibility for management of the water and sewer 
departments is vested in the Board of Selectmen. The 
departments have one full time enployee, Tim Jennings, 
Superintendent; a part-time assistant, Richard Hall; a part- 
time accounts manager, Darla Taylor; and a part-time meter 
reader. The highway department provides excavating, 
trucking and labor services for emergency repairs. 



67 



FUTURE PLANS: A water system facilities study is in 
progress. The engineer, Whitirian & Howard, Inc., Concord, 
will determine which iiiprovements to the existing water 
system need to be done next, and which new water source 
option, to include conservation measures, would best serve 
the Town to alleviate the current water supply shortage and 
provide a reliable long-term supply. A new water and sewer 
rate structure is in the planning stages. A sewer system 
service area expansion master plan is under development with 
the help of Carron Engineering, Inc., White River Junction. 
The sewer system master plan will set forth the areas of 
Town which will be served with municipal sewers. The 
remaining capacity in the sewer system must be allocated in 
a fair and equitable manner and in the best interests of the 
Town. 



68 



EQSTFIET.r) :E>I.^AlSllSrilSrG BOARID AISTD 
ZOlSrilSfG BQATtD OF ArxnUSTTMHaSTl? 

Since coming aboard in late September as your 
Planning/Zoning Administrator, I have been working very hard 
to familiarize myself with the present ordinances and RSA's 
that affect the ongoing activities within the Town. 

There have been several controversial issues under 
discussion including subdivisions, Class VI Highway 
activities, home occupations, signs and fences. The 
Anderson Hill Si±)division is virtually complete, the 
Pinnacle Peak Sub-division is still under discussion, the 
Lakeview Condos are still causing concerns, and the Shaker 
Village Area has sane new activity. 

There have been about a dozen Major and Minor Sub-divisions 
approved, several Home Occupations have been considered and 
the Class VI Highway situation has not been resolved yet. 

The proposed commercial activities along 1-89 have raised 
many concerns of voters as well as Town Officials. Much 
remains to be considered in the near future. 

With diligence by all and continued constructive directives 
from concerned citizens, we will continue to address all 
situations as they arise. 

Francis V. Lorabardi 
Planning/Zoning Administrator 



69 



The Enfield Police Department serves a population of 4,000 
and an increased summer seasonal population enjoying our 
lakes and ponds. Our patrol area enconpasses 42 square 
miles networked with nearly 100 miles of road. Three well 
traveled primary transverse the community. The department 
is authorized a staff of three officers managed by a chief 
and a sergeant. This staff is augmented by 4 part-tiine 
officers to provide 24 hour service to the town. Each 
officer is fully certified by the State of New Hairpshire. 

Most of our efforts are directed towards service type 
activities. Criminal activity is minimal considering the 
concentration of people and the number of transients in our 
area. Only 10 burglaries were reported during this report 
period of which 4 were cleared by arrest and conviction. 
The department did receive three federal grants for highway 
safety projects through the New Hampshire Highway Safety 
Agency. These grants provided federal funds to support 
additional RADAR speed enforcement and DWI enforcement. A 
third grant provided funds to purchase a giant RADAR speed 
display. These grant programs have had a tremendous inpact 
on our attempts to maintain safe travel in Enfield. 

The department continues to be ever vigilant to the illegal 
drug problem. Our endeavors incorporate both enforcement 
and educational efforts. We wish to acknowledge the 
outstanding efforts of Dr. Carr, Mr. Miller, and Mr. Stone 
in the placement of comprehensive drug education programs at 
all levels of our school system. Officer Richard A. Crate, 
Jr. and State Trooper James Mayers have been assigned as 
Bare (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) instructors. The 
primary emphasis of this program is to assist students in 
recognizing and resisting the pressures that influence them 
to e35)eriment with drugs. Both officers are actively 
working in the classroans and socializing with students 
during lunch periods at the school to inplant the message of 
resistance to illegal drugs. 

It is because of the later efforts coupled with the fact 
that we are a community of good citizens that our crime rate 
is so low. We like to say that we have the largest police 
department in the State as we really do have 4,000 people 
working together for the common good. 



70 





1990 


1989 


1988 


1987 


1986 


Criminal Complaints 


489 


335 


241 


174 


262 


Service Calls 


3,268 


2,473 


2,049 


1,041 


1,560 


Motor Vehicle Accidents 


136 


150 


128 


136 


133 


Fatal 











1 


- 


With Injuries 


16 


16 


18 


12 


22 


Damages $500+ 


57 


62 


48 


66 


60 


Report Crimes 












(UCR) 


72 


113 


78 


66 


62 


Assaults 


8 


18 


15 


17 


14 


Burglary 


10 


19 


6 


14 


15 


Theft 


51 


74 


54 


31 


28 


Sexual Assaults 








1 


1 


5 


Auto Thefts 


3 


2 


2 


3 


- 


Court Actions 


758 


464 


650 


648 


323 


Criminal Arrests 


140 


142 


121 


171 


61 


Out-of-state 


36 


28 


21 


38 


11 


Out -of -Town 


51 


43 


57 


62 


22 


Local 


53 


71 


43 


71 


28 


Patrol Mileage 


101,113 


100,292 


94,338 


92,885 


83,257 


Monthly Average 


8,426 


8,358 


7,861 


7,740 


6,938 



November 1, 1989 through October 31, 1990 



71 



EUSTFIET.O £>TJBI_.IC LXBRAFtY 



Acquisition efforts this year, in addition to enhancing 
the general collection were directed toward strengthening 
the microfilm and reference collections. While the Library- 
has a popular selection of books-on-tape an increased patron 
interest in videos has pronpted a need to e^q^and audio- 
visual offerings. Videos available for loan include PBS 
series, classic movies and a selection of titles of interest 
to children. More videos are planned for 1991. 

The custamary services and programs of previous years 
were continued in 1990. The summer storytime was expanded 
to include a monthly program. This was under the direction 
of Susan Mellow, Francine Lozeau and Rebecca Jennings who 
volunteered the countless hours needed to maintain a program 
of this type. The Library also received a Literacy Grant 
designed to be shared with other local libraries. The funds 
will be used primarily to provide much needed and often 
requested adult literacy and GED materials. 

The library staff and patrons mourn the loss of Phyllis 
Goodwin who served on the Library Board of Trustees for 
fifteen years. Her dedication and interest in Library 
affairs will be missed by all. 

Space requirements to meet present and anticipated use 
of the Library and its services is a current topic for the 
T library administration. Shelving and equipment have been 
added regularly to meet the demands of increased usage and 
an expanded collection. With the needed addition of more 
shelving in the non-fiction section there will be no space 
remaining for programming. The main section of the Library 
accommodates reference, circulation, administration, book 
processing, a portion of the adult collection and the 
juvenile collection. The juvenile area is also in need of 
more shelving for oversize books. Currently books are being 
stored on the floor. The planned installation of a 
reference stack will contribute to a cranped and awkward 
user traffic pattern. It is not premature or unrealistic to 
begin planning now for future community needs. 

In closing, I would like to thank all who volunteered 
their time, donated books and made gifts to the Library. 
Your help and continued support is greatly appreciated. 

Marjorie A. Carr 
Librarian 



72 



re:e>or.t of the TOt^^sr 

djOCTC CQMiyLITTEE ( of oix^ ) 



The following is perhaps the final report on Enfield's Town 
Clock. A short history seems in order. It begins with the 
purchase of a bell in 1879 and a four-faced clock to work 
with the bell the following year. These were placed in the 
tower of the Congregationalist Church at the comer of Rte. 
4 and High Street. After several transfers of ownership, 
the clock became the property of William Lapan in 1972. 
Because of unclear ownership, the Town purchased the bell 
from Mr. Lapan. In 1985 Mr. Lapan notified the Town that he 
was no longer willing to assume the liability of the clock 
and the tower, in its unsafe condition. 

At a public hearing that year, it was agreed that the 
citizens did not want to lose the clock and a committee was 
formed to investigate possible locations to re-establish the 
clock (the wooden tower was beyond repair) . The chosen 
location was the watch tower on Whitney Hall. An evaluation 
was done and the results showed that the cost of $80,000 for 
strengthening the tower area, to handle the weight of both 
the clock and the bell, far exceeded the funds available, 
(there was an anonymous donation of $10,000, matched by Town 
Meeting vote in 1986, plus other donations — current amount 
in the account is just over $22,000). 

With this discouraging news, the committee seemed to lose 
interest. In all fairness, there have been many other 
projects and causes (ie., police facility, zoning, property 
re-valuation, etc.) to command citizen attention. Because 
there hasn't been any evidence of an effort to establish the 
clock in a new location for many months, the larger 
contributors to the fund have requested the return of their 
donations. To avoid this event and to breath life into the 
project one more time, I am making a few last efforts. 



73 



I recently attended a meeting of the Enfield Historical 
Society. My message to the members was that this project 
really belonged to them, rather than a new-comer ( I ' ve only 
been here 30 years ) . I didn ' t feel the response to my 
request for support was any more positive than it had been 
to ads for volunteers in the past. 

My final efforts include a contract with the Balzer Family 
Tower Clock Specialists of Freeport, Maine. The Selectmen 
have authorized $200 to have this conpany send a 
representative to Enfield to view the conponents of the 
clock, the bell and the Whitney Hall tower. They will send 
the Town a written report with their analysis and 
recommendations. I have also made a commitment to drive to 
Phillips, Maine, to meet with a member of a committee that 
has recently purchased and established a clock in their 
church tower. 

Once I have conpleted my self -assigned tasks, I will be 
looking for some interested citizens to move the project 
forward. If I haven't had a positive response by i^ril 1st, 
I will give a final report to the Board of Selectmen and 
regretfully recommend that the Clock Committee be disbanded 
and the donations returned with our appreciation to the 
contributors . 



Respectfully submitted, 
Evelyn L. Palmer 



74 



1 9 9 O ryEE>OR.T 

Fiscal year 1990 has been a year of change for Grafton 
County. The retirement of long-time County Administrator 
William Siegmund pronpted the Commissioners to reorganize 
the overall administrative structure of the County. Top 
administrative positions now include the Executive Director, 
Nursing Home Administrator, Superintendent of Corrections, 
Farm Manager, and Superintendent of Maintenance. The 
reorganization has irrproved the efficiency and effectiveness 
of County operations without increasing costs. 

The Sheriff's Department has also undergone a transition 
under the leadership of Sheriff Charles Baixy. The Dispatch 
Center has been upgraded, courthouse security has been 
iirproved, and an expanded training program has been offered 
to help county and municipal law enforcement meet State 
requirements. The Department's work load has continued to 
grow, reflecting the increase in Superior Court cases. 

As a first set in addressing space problems at the Grafton 
County Courthouse, the County legislative Delegation 
appropriated $250,000 of surplus to construct administrative 
offices between the courthouse and nursing home. The 
Commissioners' Office moved into the new administrative 
building in early January, freeing additional space for the 
County Attorney's Office and the State Probation and Parole 
Office. Construction cost considerably less than that 
projected for an addition to the courthouse. 

Fiscally, Grafton County continues to be very sound. 
Working together, the Commissioners and Legislative 
Delegation limited budget increased to 4.4%, from $11.2 
million in fiscal year 1990 to $11.7 million for fiscal year 
1991. We are especially pleased that the county tax 
actually decreased 5% from $6.3 million in fiscal year 1990 
to just $6.0 million in fiscal year 1991. A budget surplus 
from the previous fiscal year plus increases in nursing home 
revenues and Sheriff's Department fees contributed to the 
tax decrease. 

Nevertheless, property taxes continue to fund approxiinately 
half of the County budget, with the rest coming from a 
combination of State and federal monies and user fees. The 
Connissioners , through the New Hampshire Association of 



75 



Counties, continue to monitor State legislative proposals 
that would increase county costs, thereby increasing local 
property taxes. During the 1990 legislative session we were 
effective in averting attenpts to increase th County share 
of Medicaid costs and eliminate the Medically Needy Program, 
which would have forced counties to absorb nursing home 
costs for medically needy residents or ask towns to provide 
general assistance. 

During fiscal year 1990 Grafton County also distributed a 
total of $78,836 in State Incentive Funds to programs that 
prevent out-of-home placements of troubled children and 
youth. Included were drug and alcohol abuse prevention 
programs, parenting skills workshops, parent aides, child 
care training and referrals, services to pregnant teens, and 
court diversion for first-time youthful offenders. The 
Commissioners also expanded the County-funded Youth and 
Family Mediation Program to provide services county-wide, 
adding the Plymouth center to those in Lebanon and 
Littleton. These efforts help limit county e55)enditures for 
court-ordered services to children and youth ($611,462 in 
fiscal year 1990). 

The Grafton County Board of Commissioners hold regular 
weekly meeting on Thursday at 9:30 am. at the Grafton County 
Commissioners Office Building. Every fourth Thursday 
afternoon the Commissioners also meet at the Nursing Home, 
House of Corrections and Farm, followed by a tour of each 
facility. All meetings are open to the public, and we 
encourage public and press attendance. Please feel free to 
contact th Commissioners: PO Box 108, Woodsville, NH 03785. 
Telephone (603) 787-6941, 

In closing, we wish to express our appreciation to all staff 
members, elected officials, other agency personnel and the 
public for their efforts in serving the citizens of Grafton 
County. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Grafton County Commissioners 

Betty Jo Taffe, Chairman (District 3) 
Everett Grass, Vice Chairman (District 2) 
Gerard Zeiller, Clerk (District 1) 



76 



* 24-Hbur Hbtllne 

In an emergency, someone is always available at 
Headrest to offer personal support and help to locate 
resources. Headrest's Hotline is certified by the American 
Association of Suicidology, and phone workers have special 
expertise in handling crises involving the use of alcohol or 
drugs. Hotline workers are trained to be understanding, 
listen carefully to the caller, and lend emotional support 
in a non- judgmental way. 

* Information & Referral 

People can call Headrest whenever they have a question 
or problem and are not sure where to turn. Headrest has 
information on local services, tenants' & consumers' rights, 
drugs & alcohol, legal assistance, counseling services, and 
support groups. Headrest has also been designated by ACoRN 
to be its contact point for information on AIDS issues. 

* Shelter for the Hcmeless 

Terrporary lodging is offered to homeless people 
referred to Headrest by local police, hospitals, churches, 
and mental health centers. Also, supervised overnight 
lodging is available for intoxicated persons with funding 
from New Hampshire & Vermont Offices of Alcohol & Drug Abuse 
Prevention. 

* Alcohol & Drug P r og r am 

Headrest offers information, educational presentations, 
plus individual and family counseling around substance abuse 
issues. Headrest is virtually the only free or low cost 
drug & alcohol counseling service in the Upper Valley. 

* Teenline 

Headrest's Teenline began operating in March, 1990. 
Teen volunteers who have conpleted the demanding Teenline 
training program are available three afternoons & evenings a 
week to take calls from their peers. Back-up at other times 
is provided by Headrest's 24-Hour Hotline. Great enphasis 
is put on helping teens concerned about their own and 
others' drug & alcohol problems, who may be depressed or 
suicidal, victims of abuse, and young people who may just be 
in need of a caring listener. 

In 1990, 160 Enfield residents called Headrest's Hotline a 
total of 376 times, including 13 suicide calls. 



77 



hose>xc:e of the UI>F»ER. ^zt xt .t .T^r sr 

Hope means to keep living 
amid desperation 
and to keep humming 
in the darkness. 

-- Henri Nouwen 

Hospice of the Upper Valley helps people live as fully as 
possible in the face of death, illness, and grief. Hospice 
provides education programs and direct care services free of 
charge to 25 communities in VT and NH. During 1990: 

SERVICE 

Hospice helped 554 patients, families and friends in 
its four categories of service: ancillary medical support; 
bereavement care; short-term counseling; information and 
referral . 

Twenty-five people from Enfield used our services (from a 
total of 412 people, excluding Inf orniation/Ref erral ) . 

The care patients and families receive is overseen and 
guided by the Hospice Interdisciplinary Team, which includes 
at least one representative from the following professions: 
clergy, discharge planner. Hospice nurse, home health nurse, 
oncology nurse, physiciam, social worker. Hospice volunteer. 

EDUCATION 

Working in conjuction with a local AIDS action group. 
Hospice offered an AIDS buddy training for those interest in 
helping people with AIDS, Eight people complete the course 
making a total of seventeen buddies currently available. 

Three Hospice volunteers live in Enfield. 

PROCH^AM 

Hospice's major sources of income include memorial 
gifts, individual donations, and town support. We are not a 
United Way Agency. 

In 1990, Enfield allocated $525 towards our $92,000 
operating budget. For fiscal year 1991, we are reguesting 
$750 towards $97,000 of anticipated eaq^enses. 

Hospice of the Upper Valley services are available free 
of charge. Call Hospice at (603) 448-5182 for further 
information. 



78 



i-iz^scx^iyLA. HOME hhiai_.th: ser.-v^ices 



We are pleased once again to have this opportunity to report 
on the work done by Mascoraa Home Health Services this past 
year. 

Services and prograins have been developed to meet the needs 
as seen by the local population that we serve. To do this 
we plan care for each individual. It is this very 
individualized care that makes home care so satisfactory to 
those who need very highly skilled nursing care as well as 
to those who just need some help with daily tasks and 
everything in between so that they may remain in their 
hemes. 

The agency also offers a cortprehensive child health program 
which includes a well child clinic, parenting support 
groups, and parent aides. All of these programs are to help 
young families care for themselves and their children in the 
most positive way possible. 

Blood Pressure Screenings Clinics are available monthly at 
the Senior Center and a monthly Foot Care Clinic at the 
office on Main Street in Canaan. Anyone is welcome to come 
to the clinics or if you would like further infontiation just 
give us a call. We are here for you. 

This year the professional staff has made 7331 home visits 
in the Mascoma Valley. In the Town of Enfield 3026 visits 
were made to 308 individuals. 

Thank you for the support you have given us. We look 
forward to working with you in the coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Janet G. Knight 
Executive Director 



79 



TOt^nsr FOREST FIRE VTAJ^IDElSr 
Sc ST.A.TE FOREST RAISTGER. 

During Calendar Year 1990, the State of New Hanpshire 
experienced an average number of wildfires. The three 
leading causes of these wildfires were fires kindled without 
a fire permit from the Forest Fire Warden, permit fires that 
escaped control and rekindled fires. All of these fires are 
preventable, but ONLY with your help. 

Please help your town and state forest fire officials with 
fire prevention. New Hairpshire State Law (RSA 224:27 II) 
requires that, "No person, firm or corporation shall kindle 
or cause to be kindled any fire or bum or cause to be 
burned any material in the open, except when the ground is 
covered with snow, without first obtaining a written fire 
permit from the Forest Fire Warden of the town where the 
burning is to be done . " 

Violations of RSA 224:27 II and the other burning laws of 
the State of New Hanpshire are misdemeanors punishable by 
fines of up to $1,000 and/or a year in jail and you are also 
liable for all fire suppression costs. 

The State of New Hanpshire, Division of Forests and Lands 
assisted many towns in wildland fire suppression during 
1990, including a 262 acre fire in Moultonboro and several 
fires in Hooksett. 

In 1990, the New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands 
trained 844 local Wardens and Deputy Wardens in the Incident 
Connand System (ICS), an incident management system for all 
types of emergencies. In 1991, Wardens will be trained in 
the use of Class A foam in wildfire suppression. 

If you have any questions regarding New Hairpshire forest 
fire laws, please contact your local Forest Fire Warden, 
State Forest Ranger, or the Division of Forests and Lands at 
271-2217. 

FOREST FIRE STATISTICS - 1990 

TCMN OF ENFIELD 





STATE 


DISTRICT 


Number of Fires 


489 


32 


Acres Burned 


473 


38 



Bryan C. Nowell, Forest Ranger 
Donald Crate, Forest Fire Warden 



80 



UI>E>ER. \ZAXJliEY HOXJSEHOrJZ) - 

Piz^^.?^LE^rx:)US vxa^te cxDaynytXTTEE 

The Upper Valley Household Hazardous Waste Committee 
held its seventh annual collection of household hazardous 
waste materials, May 5, 1990. 

The 1989 annual collection served 280 households and 
no one had to be turned away. Last May, over 340 
households were served with the help of a 20% increase in 
budget. When our funds were exhausted, the hauler had to 
close down, and about 100 cars were turned away. This 
increase in community participation shows that citizens are 
aware of the ijiportance of keeping toxic materials out of 
landfills and are willing to support such a program with 
their own efforts. 

The Committee receives the major portion of its 
financial support from regional landfills in the Upper 
Valley. In addition, contributions from local businesses 
and organizations, grants from the states of New Hanpshire 
and Verroont, and on-site donations have made it possible 
for us to conduct seven successful annual Collection Days. 
However, each year costs increase for the disposal of the 
hazardous materials at out-of-state licensed facilities. 
This year, the Committee is looking for additional funds so 
that all residents who come to the site can be served. 

The next Collection Day will be held May 4, 1991. 
Area residents are welcome. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Colin High, Chair 



81 



TOWISr lyDEETIlSrG jyn^FLCJti 13, X9 9 
EJSTFIET.O, ISTEVsT HLAJy[E>SHIRE 



Article 1. 

The Moderator declared the following chosen by ballot: 

Selectinan for three years - Donald J. Crate 

Town Clerk for three years - Ilene P. Reed 

Treasurer for three years - Catherine A. Russi 

Moderator for two years - William A. Warren 

Supervisor of the Checklist for six years - Robert Hewitt 

Trustee of Trust Funds for three years - John Goodwin 

Auditor for one year - vacant 

Fire Ward for three years - Donald A. Crate 

Recreation Commission for three years - Theron 0. Chase 

Recreation Commission for two years - Vicki Pellerin 

Recreation Commission for two years - Jane Smardon 

Library Trustee for three years - Phyllis B. Goodwin 

Amendment No. 1 - 551 YES, 545 NO. Adoption of Town Zoning 
Ordinance . 

Optional Adjusted Elderly Exeirption - 930 YES, 81 NO. 
Adopted. 

Article 2. 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of two hundred and eighty-eight thousand dollars 
($288,000) for the construction and furnishings of a new 
Police Facilities Building and to fund such appropriation in 
the name of the Town by the issuance of serial notes or 
bonds, in accordance with the provisions of the Municipal 
Finance Act (RSA 33) and amendments thereto. (2/3 paper 
ballot passage required). 268 YES, 183 NO. There were 451 
ballots cast, 304 YES were needed for a two-thirds passage. 
Article 2 fails. 

Article 3. 

Passed as printed with a voice vote - To see if the Town 
will vote to authorize the Selectmen to borrow money in 
anticipation of taxes, as provided under RSA 33. 



82 



Article 4. 

Article 4 failed with a hand vote, 79 YES, 141 NO - To see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
twenty- four thousand five hundred dollars ($24,500) for the 
purpose of replacing the Town Beach building. 

Article 5. 

Article 5 passed as printed with a hand vote, 314 YES, 21 NO 
- To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) to develop a 
solid waste management plan. 

Article 6. 

Article 6 failed with a hand vote, 61 YES, 216 NO - To see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
five thousand dollars ($5,000) for the construction of a 
hiking trail as proposed by the Conservation Commission. 

Article 7. 

Article 7 passed as printed with a hand vote - 229 YES, 18 
No - To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $278,142 for the following purposes: Fire Truck, 
Town Reappraisal, Cemetery Land Acquisition, Water 
Department Inprovement, Municipal Buildings and Whitney 
Hall, and to authorize the withdrawal of this sum from the 
respective Capital Reserve Funds. 

Article 8. 

Article 8 passed as printed with a hand vote - 247 YES, 16 
NO - To see if the Town will vote to accept the budget as 
reconmended by the Budget Committee and vote to raise and 
appropriate the sum of $2,220,968 for the purposes therein 
stated. 



83 



Article 9. 

Article 9 passed as printed with a voice vote - Pursuant to 
a petition by ten (10) or more legal voters to adopt the 
provisions of RSA 72:28, V and VI for an optional veteran's 
exemption and an expanded qualifying war service for 
veterans seeking the exenption. The optional veteran's 
exemption is $100 rather than $50. 

Article 10. 

Article 10 passed as printed with a voice vote - Pursuant to 
a petition by ten (10) or more legal voters to adopt the 
provisions of RSA 72:35, IV for an optional property tax 
exertption on residential property for a service-connected 
total disability. The optional disability exenption is 
$1,400 rather than $700. 

Article 11. 

Article 11 passed as printed with a voice vote - To see if 
the Town will authorize the Enfield Planning Board to 
prepare and amend a recommended program of Municipal Capital 
Iirprovement Projects as provided by State Statutes RSA 
674:5-8. 

Article 12. 

Article 12 passed as printed with a voice vote - To see if 
the Town will vote to adopt the proposed bylaw which will 
require waste haulers in the Town to set a lower rate for 
customers who sort and separate their solid waste for 
recycling purposes in the form which had been posted with 
the Warrant and made available on the date of the meeting 
(bylaw was printed) . 

Article 13. 

Article 13 passed as printed with a voice vote - Pursuant to 
a petition of ten (10) or more legal voters to see if the 
Town will vote to designate and proclaim April 22, 1990 as 
Earth Day 1990, and to set aside that day for public 
activities promoting preservation of the global environment 
and launching the "Decade of the Environment" . 



84 



Article 14. 

Article 14 passed as printed with a voice vote - To see if 
the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell or 
lease any or all parcels of real estate acquired by the Town 
through Tax Collector's deed for non-payment of taxes, or 
any or all parcels not in public use; and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to execute and deliver in the name of the 
Town suitable deeds or leases of such real estate. The 
Selectmen may sell any real estate acquired by a Tax 
Collector's deed to the person whom the taxes were assessed, 
at private sale but all other sales shall be public sale to 
be advertised by suitable public notice. 

Article 15. 

Article 15 passed as printed with a voice vote - To see if 
the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to make 
application for and to receive and expend, in the name of 
the Town, such gifts, advances, grants-in-aid. Federal 
Revenue Sharing Funds, HUD, EDA, EPA, FHA, BOR, N.H. Highway 
Safety, or other funds for any Town purposes as may be 
forthcoming from the United States Government, The State of 
New Hairpshire, or any other Federal, State or local agency 
or person. 

Article 16. 

Article 16 passed as printed with a voice vote - To see if 
the Town will vote to adopt amendments to the Sewer 
Ordinance proposed by the Board of Selectmen, as posted with 
the Town Warrant. 

Article 17. 

Article 17 passed as printed with a voice vote - To see if 
the Town will vote to eliminate the position of Town 
Auditor, effective after the 1991 regular Town Meeting, 
since the Town errploys a Certified Public Accountant, as 
provided in RSA 41; 31. 



85 



Article 18. 

Article 18 passed as printed with a voice vote - To hear 
the reports of agents, auditors, coinmittees , or any other 
officers heretofore chosen and pass any vote relating 
thereto . 

The above is not a coirplete copy of the minutes of the March 
13th, 1990 Town Meeting, but a record of the actual vote. 



Carolee T. Hi^Dee 
Deputy Town Clerk 



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97 



For the year ended December 31, 1990 



Date of Place of Name of 

Death Death Deceased Age 

Jan. 19 Hanover Dorothy L. Scripture 79 

Feb. 9 Hanover Evelyn Etta Hammond 82 

Mar. 3 Hanover Eddie A. Hollenbeck 79 

Mar. 19 Hanover Anita E. Martin 70 

Mar. 25 Enfield Jack Carter Blanchard 53 

Mar. 27 Hanover Edgar A. Giguere 74 

i^r. 30 Hanover Kevin Fred Clark 26 

May 11 Enfield Dennie C. Smith 83 

May 12 Enfield Robert S. Kenney 66 

June 5 Hanover Walter C. Emery 26 

June 5 Hanover Adeline Diantha Bill 82 

June 12 Hanover Paul L. Martin 72 

June 19 Enfield Dorothy R. Murphy 58 

June 25 Enfield Wallace Raymond Neily 60 

July 30 Enfield Neil Forest Wescott 56 

Aug. 15 Hanover Joseph H. McGuerty 51 

Aug. 17 Lebanon Margaret F. Lorden 71 

Sept. 3 Hanover Robert V. Malz 55 

Sept. 27 Hanover Elwin H. Copeland 74 

Sept. 29 Hanover Gustav Troedl 93 

Oct. 3 Enfield Ctr. Violet Etta Patten 96 

Nov. 20 Enfield Phyllis Barbara Goodwin 72 

Nov. 24 Newark, Del. Esther M. Martin 78 

Dec. 9 Hanover Joseph L. LaPerle 63 

Dec. 27 Hanover Thalma Emerson 79 



98 



Good Government Starts With You 

If you are interested in serving on a Town committee, 
please fill out this form and mail to the Board of 
Selectmen, Whitney Hall, PO Box 373, Enfield, NH 03748. The 
filling out of this form in no way assures appointment. All 
committee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed most 
qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 



Name Home Telephone 

Address 



Amount of Time Available 



Interest in what Town Comiittees 



Present Business Affiliation and Work 
Business Experience 



Education or Special Training 
Town Offices Held 



Date J^3pointed Term Expired 

Reanarks 



99 



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